AIYA Links: 19 May

In the news

  • ‘In forging a path toward progress and away from extremism, Indonesia must return to its roots and redouble its efforts to strengthen the nation’s resolve behind the unifying ideology of Pancasila,’ says Eva Kusuma Sundari, a member of the House of Representatives and Vice Chair of ASEAN Parliamentarians for Human Rights.
  • In Asian Correspondent, Max Waldon takes a deep dive into the popularity of fisheries minister Susi Pudjiastuti. Susi won the Peter Benchley Ocean Award for Excellence in National Stewardship, awarded by Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC, last week.
  • A Sharia court in Aceh has sentenced two men to be caned in public after being found in bed together by vigilantes in March. Gay sex is not illegal in the rest of Indonesia and this is the first such conviction in Aceh.
  • A special issue of Inside Indonesia explores the 2014 Village Law, assessing the intentions and content of the law, the results so far and the possible impact the law may have.
  • ‘In Indonesia, it’s like the wild, wild West, looking for the gold rush.’ That’s the take of Ryan Gozali, a California-educated sports executive, focused on building collegiate sports in Indonesia.
  • Catch up on AIYA ACT, ANU ASEAN Society and Indonesian Student Association event ‘2017 Jakarta Election: Online and Offline‘ held this week and featuring guest speakers Ross Tapsell and Marcus Mietzner.

AIYA presents Kartini

Join AIYA as we bring 2017’s biggest Indonesian film to cinemas across Australia. Directed by Hanung Bramantyo and starring Ada Apa Dengan Cinta?’s Dian Sastrowardoyo, ‘Kartini’ tells the story of Indonesia’s most famous heroine. Watch the trailer and register for a screening near you.

At the blog

Events

Opportunities

AIYA Links: 12 May

In the news

  • On Tuesday, Jakarta Governor Ahok was sentenced to two years jail for blasphemy. Fairfax’s Jewel Topsfield and Karuni Rompies reported from Jakarta.
  • The NYT explores the reaction of legal experts to Ahok’s sentencing.
  • ‘Two back-to-back decisions have left Indonesia more religiously polarised than ever. One was politically inept, the second deeply unjust’. Sidney Jones assesses the Indonesian legal system after the ban Hizbut Tahrir and the sentencing of Ahok.
  • ‘If someone like Ahok is jailed for blasphemy, what will happen to other minorities in Indonesia?’ asks Human Rights Watch.
  • In New Mandala, Eve Warburton and Liam Gammon study exit polls from the Jakarta gubernatorial election and conclude that ‘class and ethnic identity do intersect in Indonesia, and political elites are increasingly willing to highlight and politicise this intersection.’
  • While we are here at New Mandala, Jeremy Menchik looks ahead to the 2019 Presidential election and points out key differences betweek Ahok and Jokowi.
  • In a country where only 12 million of the 260 million population filed a tax return last year, what are the benefits of a tax amnesty in Indonesia?
  • Will Australia learn from South Korea’s focus on Indonesian language literacy?
  • John G Butcher and R E Elson explore the history and herald Indonesia’s diplomatic victory in becoming recognised at an archipelagic state.

AIYA presents Kartini

Join AIYA as we bring 2017’s biggest Indonesian film to cinemas across Australia. Directed by Hanung Bramantyo and starring Ada Apa Dengan Cinta?‘s Dian Sastrowardoyo, ‘Kartini’ tells the story of Indonesia’s most famous heroine. Watch the trailer and register for a screening near you.

At the blog

  • Gamelan in Australia. Jane Ahlstrand writes about the collaboration between Sekaa Gong Sekar Langit and Kita Art Community.
  • ‘There’s almost no such thing as a bad idea when it comes to improving the Australia-Indonesia relationship; we should be trying everything.’ Read the AIBC Young Professionals’ chat with Shadow Treasurer Chris Bowen.

Events

  • Sydney, 13 May: See the Suara Indonesia Dance Group in action at a fundraiser in Newtown.
  • Melbourne, 16 May: Get exam ready at AIYA Victoria and PPIA Monash’s BERBAHASA. Or, if you’d prefer a little time away from the books, join the rest of AIYA Victoria at their weekly kick-off netball.
  • Canberra, 17 May: Join AIYA ACT for a public lecture on the 2017 Jakarta Election: the Campaign Online and Offline with Dr Ross Tapsell and Dr Marcus Mietzner.
  • Sydney, 27 May: PPIA NSW presents the Indonesian Ideas Conference, or ICON, featuring guest speakers (Kick) Andy F Noya, Daniel Mananta, Alamatnya Shantika and North Hudson Ismail.
  • Sydney, May 31: A night of lively and entertaining debate at AIYA NSW’s Great Garooda Debate.

Opportunities

AIYA Links: 5 May

In the news

  • ‘Radical Islamic groups are the new kingmakers of Indonesian politics’ argues author Eka Kurniawan in an op-ed for the New York Times after the Jakarta gubernatorial elections.
  • A congress of female Islamic clerics meeting in Cirebon have issued a fatwa urging the Indonesian government to raise the minimum legal age for women to marry from 16 to 18.
  • Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand joined forces this week to fight an EU resolution against palm oil, a major export for the three nations.
  • 40,000 protests took to the streets of Jakarta on May Day. Vice took photos.
  • Leaders of Ansor, Nahdlatul Ulama’s youth wing, are hoping to reform archaic interpretations of Islam around the world.
  • The Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) found that Freeport caused environmental degradation by dumping its waste to forests, rivers, estuaries and the ocean in the 2013-2015 fiscal year. Damages are estimated at Rp185 trillion.
  • We are excited to have a new Chapter in Indonesia, AIYA Indonesia Timur. Vice Consul Ibu Violet Rish from the Australian Consulate in Makassar launched AIYA Indonesia Timur and promoted education links with Australia at Universitas Bosowa on Wednesday.
  • The oldest living person, Mbah Ghoto, passed away this week at the age of 146. The key to his long life? ‘I have people that love me looking after me,’ he told the BBC last year.

AIYA presents Kartini

AIYA is bringing 2017’s biggest Indonesian film to cinemas across Australia in May. Directed by Hanung Bramantyo and starring Ada Apa Dengan Cinta?‘s Dian Sastrowardoyo, ‘Kartini’ tells the story of Indonesia’s most famous heroine. Watch the trailer and register for a screening near you.

At the blog

Events

  • Melbourne, 6 May: Gain insights and network with business influencers at PPIA Monash’s Australia Indonesia Business Forum.
  • Melbourne, 6 May: Join a celebration of Indonesian culture and heritage as KJRI and Kitaku.com present the Indonesian Heritage Exhibition.
  • Canberra, 9 May: Meet the Canberra Indonesian community at AIYA ACT’s Networking Night at the Indonesian Embassy.
  • Ubud, 12-14 May: Catch Indonesian-born My Kitchen Rules winners Tasia & Gracia Seger at the third Ubud Food Festival, along with over 80 members of Indonesia’s culinary industry.
  • Sydney, 13 May: See the Suara Indonesia Dance Group  in action at a fundraiser in Newtown.
  • Sydney, 27 May: PPIA NSW presents the Indonesian Ideas Conference, or ICON, featuring guest speakers (Kick) Andy F Noya, Daniel Mananta, Alamatnya Shantika and North Hudson Ismail.

Opportunities

AIYA Links: 28 April

In the news:

  • Catching up on the commentary from last week’s Jakarta gubernatorial elections many have analysed what it means and predicted what happens next.
  • Philips J. Vermonte, at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) looks at the reasons why Agnes was elected and areas the incumbent Governor needs to pay attention to.
  • Elite political forces and religion were key influences notes Helen Brown.
  • ‘The election has polarised Indonesia, intimidated religious and racial minorities and greatly strengthened the hand of Islamist hardliners’ argues Tim Lindsay at the University of Melbourne.
  • ‘Plainly, the outcome is a defeat for tolerance’ says the Economist.
  • However, religion wasn’t the only factor in the outcome of the election, argues Max Waldon. Ahok was never loved by all and Anies and Sandiaga ran a slick political campaign.
  • In the Lowy Interpreter Erin Cook looks ahead to what this means for the 2019 Presidential race.
  • Ross Tapsell assesses how the Ahok campaign failed, and why Jokowi should worry.
  • In other news, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati says the government’s revenue projections are “on track” amid strengthening economic growth in Indonesia.
  • As Australians mark Anzac Day this week, Heather Merle Benbow explores trade in coffee between Australian soldiers and East Timorese during World War Two and that trade today.
  • Can a partnership between Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation and an Indonesian palm oil company protect orangutans on Salat Island? The New York Times addresses the unlikely partnership.
  • Taking a look at the broader Australia-ASEAN relationship, ANU’s John Blaxland encourages Australia to think big on mulitlateralism.
  • The ANU’s College of Asia & the Pacific have released a collection of essays on the Trump Administration’s first hundred days and asked, what should Asia do?

AIYA presents Kartini

  • AIYA is bringing 2017’s biggest Indonesian film to cinemas across Australia in May. Directed by Hanung Bramantyo and starring Ada Apa Dengan Cinta?‘s Dian Sastrowardoyo, ‘Kartini’ tells the incredible true story of Indonesia’s most famous heroine. Watch the trailer and register for a screening near you.

At the AIYA blog

  • Part 2 of our chat with historian of Indonesia, David Reeve, about his latest project on Minangkabau public transport. Missed Part 1 last week? Catch up here.
  • In the first of our film reviews from Indonesian Film Festival, AIYA Victoria President Sam Shlansky reviews Nia Dinata’s Ini Kisah Tiga Dara (Three Sassy Sisters). The film serves as a homage to the classic 1957 musical film Tiga Dara.

Events

  • Sydney, 29 April: Javanese gamelan, music and dance in Newtown feat. Suara Indonesia Dance Group.
  • Melbourne, 29-30 April: Pop by AIYA Victoria’s stall at the Nusantara Street Festival 2017 at Queen Victoria Market.
  • Perth, Melbourne, 1 – 2 May: Asialink and AIBC present their State of the Nation: Indonesia event. AIYA Members receive a special discount rate – contact your local AIYA Chapter for more information.
  • Sydney, 4 May: An evening of Balinese art and dance at the Australian Museum.
  • Melbourne, 6 May: DWP KJRI & Kisaku.com presents Indonesian Heritage Exhibition at the Indonesian Consulate General.
  • Canberra, 9 May: Join AIYA ACT’s Networking Night.
  • Gold Coast, 21-28 May: Keen to see Australia’s and Indonesia’s best badminton players in action? Check out the Sudirman Cup.
  • Surabaya, 22 May: Perth US Asia Centre’s Surabaya Panel Discussion at Airlangga University.

Opportunities