FROM THE ARCHIVES – 10 Tips for New Colombo Plan Scholarship Applicants

The New Colombo Plan (NCP) Scholarship Program is an Australian Government initiative that facilitates student, business and institutional engagement at an international level by sending 100 Australian undergraduate students to live, study and work in the Indo-Pacific region for up to 17 months.

Isaac Bennett, a current member of the AIYA Yogyakarta team was fortunate enough to receive a 2016 NCP Scholarship and is currently studying at Universitas Gadjah Mada. Read on for his top ten tips for applying for this unique and extremely worthwhile opportunity.

ncp

Be confident

Okay, so you’re applying for the NCP. Brilliant! You’ve made a great decision – be confident with it. The proverbial road to success is paved with a good dose of self-confidence. Being dedicated and committed is, truly, half the battle. This is your moment; believe it. Be realistic and take things as they come, but always be confident.

Get started now

Survey your situation – what are you doing? What are your commitments? How do they reflect you and what you can bring to the table with your application? Could you get involved and start the process now, and grow as a result? It’s never too late to begin a new experience, and the benefits are usually plural, not singular.

Study hard

It might come as no surprise that academic achievements are highly valued and very important when it comes to overseas scholarship applications. It’s no different with the NCP – putting in the hard yards now and into the future can only achieve positive results, and it provides the essential core basis for a good NCP application.

Do your research

If you’re hoping to work and study in a foreign country for a year and a half, it’s probably best to know a fair bit about that country first. Do your research and find out where best suits your field of study and areas of interest – in your case, we’re going to assume it’s probably Indonesia. So put forward your case with a sound and informed research base, which will increase your chances of success.

Consider the bigger picture

Another important aspect of your application doesn’t actually focus on you, but rather on the wider, international community. The New Colombo Plan is all about forging institutional and business links between Australian and Asia-Pacific countries including Indonesia through study and internship scholarship components, and therefore it is vital to consider your potential contribution to that process. How can you make your field of interest stand out and potentially offer something to help larger-scale international engagement?

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Isaac (right) with fellow Scholar Lachlan at the NCP Pre-Departure Briefing in Canberra. Photo: Isaac Bennett

Be succinct

The word limit for the written application is fairly small so brevity is key. Ensure your list of experiences and achievements is exhaustive and let each speak for itself as much as possible.

Choose your referees wisely

Obviously, ensure your referees are relevant and appropriate, but beyond that, choose whomever you think will reflect most accurately on you and your relevant qualities. Don’t choose one academic referee and one non-academic referee if a second academic referee might know you better.

Seek help

Don’t hesitate to get in contact with previous NCP recipients at your university or to take advantage of the many helpful services likely available to you at your university. Your university has a great interest in your success in applying to the NCP and should be very eager to help.

Don’t stress about the interview

Do your best to relax before and during the interview – there is a limit to how prepared you can realistically be, so don’t overthink it. Don’t stress – the DFAT staff and interview panel are extremely friendly and reassuring. That said, the panel has to sit through the same interview repeatedly, so if they seem bored, bemused or generally unimpressed, remember that it’s probably not your fault.

Get involved in AIYA

Well, this goes without saying! Involvement in AIYA is an excellent start in living out your dedication to Australia’s relationship with the region. We’d like to think you’d be keen to get involved anyway, but if you need extra incentive, it could potentially be a great help for your application.

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A collection of NCP Scholars meeting Foreign Minister Julie Bishop at the Australian Embassy in Jakarta.

To find out more about the New Colombo Plan Scholarship Program, head over to the website. Good luck!

AIYA Links: 20 July

Photo: Lenny K Photography/Flickr

India announced it will now allow Indonesian tourists to visit without having to apply for a visa. Meanwhile, Australia continues to miss out on the Indonesian tourist market as the visa process remains expensive, slow and bureaucratic, denying citizens of both nations an opportunity to know each other better.

Read more

In the news

  • As the trade war between the US and China kicks off, it seems Indonesia is also on Trump’s radar detecting a “suspicious” trade deficit in US-Indonesia trade relations. The US is currently studying whether to impose import tariffs on Indonesian products shipped to the US.
  • Whilst the Jokowi administration is doing a good job supporting farmers and their working conditions, it seems fewer young people are looking to work the Indonesian rice paddies. As Indonesia’s farmers continue to age, it is threatening Indonesia’s dream of rice self-sufficiency.
  • Indonesia’s plan to address regional disparities must be rooted in issues of connectivity, competitiveness and human capital, Australian ambassador Gary Quinlan stated at the 2018 Indonesia Development Forum. He says Australia can draw upon its own experience in supporting Indonesia’s efforts to tackle regional inequality.
  • In recent decades, the growing influence of transnational Salafi movements has been a matter of great concern in Indonesia. For Indonesia’s Buginese population, the As’adiyah movement seeks to promote a form of ‘Middle-Path Islam’ that might counter the influence of violent extremist within its own ethnic group.
  • Born in Indonesia to parents of Chinese descent, Theresia Gouw is now America’s richest female venture capitalist. Read her story of success!

On the blog

Events

  • Adelaide, 21 July – Gather your friends and come along to the Australia-Indonesia Association (AIA) of South Australia’s Gala Dinner and Wayang at the Art Gallery to experience the tastes and sounds of the Spice Islands. Get your tickets here!
  • Melbourne, 23 July – ‘Australia & Indonesia: Can we be friends?’, hosted by the Australia Indonesia Council and Australian Foreign Affairs will examine the turbulent relationship between Australia and Indonesia, and the missteps that have prevented the forging of a friendship. Please register as places are limited!
  • Melbourne, 1 August – The Victorian Chamber of Commerce and Industry is hosting an information seminar about Batam – an area of Indonesia in very close proximity to Singapore, which boasts sheer economic opportunity for investment. The event is free, however registration is essential to secure your spot!
  • Brisbane, 2 August – The Australia-Indonesia Youth Association (AIYA) Queensland Chapter in partnership with the Australia Indonesia Business Council (AIBC) Queensland Chapter, presents our second annual Indonesian Opportunities Networking Event. Buy your tickets here and take advantage of AIYA members using code “AIYAmember”.

Opportunities

  • Join AIYA Jawa Barat! The Chapter in Bandung is recruiting for Semester 2. All Indonesians and Australian ACICIS students are welcome to apply. Fill out an expression of interest form here!
  • Join AIYA ACT! The Chapter is looking for general committee members, please contact act.president@aiya.org.au to express your interest.
  • Join AIYA Eastern Indonesia! The team in Makassar is looking for new committee members for the AGM which will be announced shortly. Fill in this form to apply!
  • Applications for the AIC’s ReelOzInd! Short Film Festival are open! This year’s theme is ‘Youth’. Ayo, bikin film, yuk! Submissions close 31 July.
  • Calling all Indonesian speakers to join National Australia Indonesia Language Awards (NAILA) 2018 competition. Submit a video of yourself speaking in Indonesian on this year’s theme “Diversity”. Head to the NAILA website for more information. Applications are open until 31 August!
  • Volunteer registration for the 15th Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (24-28 October) is now open! New volunteer roles are available, including Indonesian Content Creator, English Content Creator, and Partnership Liaison. Register here by the 1 August.
  • Early Bird tickets for the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival are on sale now! The first round of speakers has also been announced, including Gillian Triggs, Kamila Andini, Fatima Bhutto, and Richard Oh. Learn more here.
  • The Australian phase of Australia-Indonesia Youth Exchange Program (AIYEP) will be hosted in Melbourne and Bendigo in October and November this year which means the program is looking for host families and host organisations in both locations! If you would like to be a host family or a host organisation for one of the lovely 18 Indonesian participants please apply here.
  • Calling all Community Development/International Development students, academics and practitioners, Real Indonesia are partnering with the International Association for Community Development to offer an exclusive 10-day practice exchange in Bali this October! Book by 9 August to secure your place!
  • Learning a language? Get Indonesian & English language help with UniBRIDGE Project.

Like what we do and want to join or support your local chapter to contribute to our exciting activities? Sign up as an AIYA member today!

AIYA Links: 13 July

Photo: BBC
Photo: BBC

Bahasa Indonesia was adopted to make communication easier across the vast Indonesian archipelago, but as David Fettling from the BBC writes, its simplicity has only created new barriers.

In the news

  • A recent visit to Israel by a senior Islamic figure has led to members of Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, NU, accusing the nation’s second largest Islamic party, PKS, of behaving like communists out to destroy Indonesia. According to Greg Fealy, such behaviour is emblematic of the fevered state of Islamic discourse in Indonesia.
  • Australia and Indonesia share a vital interest to create a resilient neighbourhood by overcoming inequality. Yet, Indonesia, which is estimated to be the world’s fourth-largest economy by 2050, still faces regional disparity that remains a major obstacle to broad-based growth.
  • The World Trade Organization’s (WTO) recent ruling in favour of Australia’s plain cigarette packaging law has brought to the global spotlight Indonesia’s notorious policy that puts citizens’ health after business gains.
  • Whilst at first glance, Nahdlatul Ulama, has never been in a stronger position, a closer look suggests the organisation’s position is more vulnerable and its future more uncertain. They face an ever more acute dilemma between representing a religious community and securing resources and influence within government.
  • Indonesia is predicted become the fourth largest economy in the world by 2050. Political strategist Hugh White says a powerful Indonesia could help limit China’s influence.
  • The Indonesian government launched a new online system for business registration to cut the lengthy bureaucratic procedures in a bid to drive more investment from domestic and foreign sources. Individuals or companies can now obtain necessary permits to start a business within an hour of submitting required data.

On the blog

Events

  • Melbourne, 16 July – Join the Hon Kevin Rudd and Terry Moran AC for ‘Challenges Facing Australian Governance’, hosted by the La Trobe Ideas & Society Program. Don’t miss out on what is certain to be a fascinating and illuminating conversation about governance in Australia. Book early as interest is likely to be high!
  • Melbourne, 16 July – Join AIYA Victoria and Asialink Business for the upcoming event ‘Sports, Film & Fashion – The rise of soft power in Australia’s links with Asia’ at Monash University. Don’t forget to register yourself or contact Leanne for more information.
  • Adelaide, 21 July – Gather your friends and come along to the Australia-Indonesia Association (AIA) of South Australia’s Gala Dinner and Wayang at the Art Gallery to experience the tastes and sounds of the Spice Islands. Get your tickets here!
  • Melbourne, 23 July – ‘Australia & Indonesia: Can we be friends?’, hosted by the Australia Indonesia Council and Australian Foreign Affairs will examine the turbulent relationship between Australia and Indonesia, and the missteps that have prevented the forging of a friendship. Please register as places are limited!
  • Brisbane, 17 August – Join IndoOz Business Networking Dinner with His Excellency Yohanes Kristiarto Legowo in Brisbane City Hall! This is the sixth year of the event that brings together high-level government representatives and business people from both Indonesia and Australia. AIYA QLD is offering 6 discounted tickets of $100 each. Contact qld.president@aiya.org.au or 0434886623 to take advantage of this opportunity!

Opportunities

  • Join AIYA National! Enjoy our In The Blog section so far? We are now looking for Blog Editors to join the team! Read more about the role here and apply before 15 July.
  • Join AIYA Jawa Barat! The Chapter in Bandung is recruiting for Semester 2. All Indonesians and Australian ACICIS students are welcome to apply. Fill out an expression of interest form here!
  • Join AIYA ACT! The Chapter is looking for an events officer and general committee members. Please contact act.president@aiya.org.au to express your interest.
  • Join AIYA East Indonesia! The Chapter in Makassar is looking for new committee members for the AGM which will be announced shortly. Fill in this form to apply!
  • Calling all Indonesian speakers to join National Australia Indonesia Language Awards (NAILA) 2018 competition. Submit a video of yourself speaking in Indonesian on this year’s theme “Diversity”. Total prizes for 10 categories is 11,500 AUD. Head to the NAILA website for more information. Applications are open until 31 August!
  • Volunteer registration for the 15th Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (24-28 October) is now open! New volunteer roles are available, including Indonesian Content Creator, English Content Creator, and Partnership Liaison. Register here.
  • The Australian phase of Australia-Indonesia Youth Exchange Program (AIYEP) will be hosted in Melbourne and Bendigo in October and November this year which means the program is looking for host families and host organisations in both locations! If you would like to be a host family or a host organisation for one of the lovely 18 Indonesian participants please apply here.
  • If you would like to become an Australian AIYEP participant applications are now open until 18 July! To apply you must be between 21-25 years of age, be a team player and want to learn more about Indonesia. Ayo daftar!
  • Join talented students around the globe in the 2018 Universitas Hasanuddin International Cultural Program 2018 to be held on the 13-19 August 2018 in Makassar, Indonesia! Further information is available here. Registration closes 15 July 2018, so don’t hesitate to apply!
  • Applications for the AIC’s ReelOzInd! Short Film Festival are open! This year’s theme is ‘Youth’. Ayo, bikin film, yuk! Submissions close 31 July.
  • Learning a language? Get Indonesian & English language help with UniBRIDGE Project.

Like what we do and want to join or support your local chapter to contribute to our exciting activities? Sign up as an AIYA member today!

 

 

AIYA Links: 6 July 2018

NAILA

NAILA 2018 is now open for applications!

Go to the Opportunities section below to find out more.

In the news

  • Last week, voters in half of Indonesia’s 34 provinces went to the polls to elect their leaders. However, it was not a good result for incumbents in general with 5 of the 7 who contested the elections failing to be re-elected.
  • While the Indo-Pacific is slowly replacing Asia-Pacific as the dominant economic and security paradigm, it remains subject to numerous security challenges. Enhancing the Indo-Australis strategic triangle, comprised of Australia, India and Indonesia is seen as the first step in overcoming the area’s numerous security challenges.
  • Jokowi officially inaugurated Indonesia’s first wind farm, located in South Sulawesi. With similar projects in West Java and East Kalimantan currently in development, its suggested to mark the beginning of Indonesia’s embrace of renewable energy.
  • Indonesia’s Ministry of Education and Culture have recently instituted a new regulation regarding admittance of students. Prospective students of public schools will now be admitted based on a zone system, defined by proximity of a household to a school.
  • ANU researcher Dr Ross Tapsell met Bandung mayor Ridwan Kamil the day after his victory in the West Java gubernatorial election. He answered some questions for the New Mandela readership about ‘black campaigns’, the religious vote, and even running for president.

On the blog

  • Recently, new archaeological findings have revealed the lives of early Aboriginal Australians as early as 65,000 years ago. But how was it even possible for people to get to Australia in the first place? A recent study shows that colonisation of Australia by 50,000 years ago was achieved by a globally significant phase of purposeful and coordinated marine voyaging from Southeast Asia.
  • With the National Australia Indonesian Language Awards (NAILA) applications opening this week, we revisit NAILA Tertiary Awardee Shant Omodei-James’ experience of presenting her speech submission at the distinguished contest in 2016.

Events

  • Jakarta, 9 July – “Joining global production networks: has Indonesia missed the boat?” will be the topic of the 2018 Hadi Soesastro Lecture by ANU Professor Prema-chandra Athukorala in Jakarta at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Please register as space is limited!
  • Jakarta, 11 July – Join AIYA Jakarta to watch the Banda Movie Screening at the GoWork Space, Pacific Place at 7pm on Wednesday 11 July. Check out the Facebook event here!
  • Melbourne, 16 July – Join The Hon Kevin Rudd and Terry Moran AC for ‘Challenges Facing Australian Governance’, hosted by the La Trobe Ideas & Society Program. Don’t miss out on what is certain to be a fascinating and illuminating conversation about governance in Australia.  Please book early as interest is likely to be high!
  • Adelaide, 21 July – Gather your friends and come along to the Australia-Indonesia Association (AIA) of South Australia’s Gala Dinner and Wayang at the Art Gallery to experience the tastes and sounds of the Spice Islands. Get your tickets here!
  • Melbourne, 23 July – ‘Australia & Indonesia: Can we be friends?’, hosted by the Australia Indonesia Council and Australian Foreign Affairs will examine the turbulent relationship between Australia and Indonesia, and the missteps that have prevented the forging of a friendship. Please register as places are limited!

Opportunities

  • Join AIYA National! Enjoy our In The Blog section so far? We are now looking for Blog Editors to join the team! Read more about the role here and apply before 15 July.
  • Join AIYA ACT! The Chapter is looking for an events officer and general committee members, please contact president@aiya.org.au to express your interest.
  • Join AIYA East Indonesia! The Chapter in Makassar is looking for new committee members for the AGM which will be announced shortly. Go to https://tinyurl.com/yc5axgau to apply.
  • Calling all Indonesian speakers to join National Australia Indonesia Language Awards (NAILA) 2018 competition. Submit a video of yourself speaking in Indonesian on this year’s theme “Diversity”. Total prizes for 10 categories is 11,500 AUD. Head to the NAILA website for more information. Applications are open until 31 August!
  • The Australian phase of Australia-Indonesia Youth Exchange Program (AIYEP) will be hosted in Melbourne and Bendigo in October and November this year which means the program is looking for host families and host organisations in both locations! If you would like to be a host family or a host organisation for one of the lovely 18 Indonesian participants please apply here.
  • If you would like to become an Australian AIYEP participant applications are now open until 18 July! To apply you must be between 21-25 years of age, be a team player and want to learn more about Indonesia. Ayo daftar!
  • Join talented students around the globe in the 2018 Universitas Hasanuddin International Cultural Program 2018 to be held on the 13-19 August 2018 in Makassar, Indonesia! Further information is available here. Registration closes 15 July 2018, so don’t hesitate to apply!
  • Applications for the AIC’s ReelOzInd! Short Film Festival are open! This year’s theme is ‘Youth’. Ayo, bikin film, yuk! Submission close 31 July.
  • Learning a language? Get Indonesian & English language help with UniBRIDGE Project.

Like what we do and want to join or support your local chapter to contribute to our exciting activities? Sign up as an AIYA member today!

How to get to Australia … more than 50,000 years ago

Over just the past few years, new archaeological findings have revealed the lives of early Aboriginal Australians in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu potentially as early as 65,000 years ago, from the Kimberley and Pilbara regions of Western Australia by about 50,000 years ago, and the Flinders Ranges of South Australia by around 49,000 years ago.

By Sean Ulm, James Cook University; Alan Cooper, University of Adelaide; Michael Bird, James Cook University; Peter Veth, University of Western Australia; Robin Beaman, James Cook University, and Scott Condie, CSIRO

File 20180509 34038 18ofom4.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
Sunset looking across Port Warrender to the Mitchell Plateau on the Kimberley coast. It is in Wunambal Gaambera country. Mark Jones Films (with permission), Author provided

But how was it even possible for people to get to Australia in the first place? And how many people must have made it to Australia to explain the diversity of Aboriginal people today?

In a study published in Quaternary Science Reviews this week, we use new environmental reconstructions, voyage simulations, and genetic population estimates to show for the first time that colonisation of Australia by 50,000 years ago was achieved by a globally significant phase of purposeful and coordinated marine voyaging.

Past environments

Australia has never been connected by dry land to Southeast Asia. But at the time that people first arrived in Australia, sea levels were much lower, joining the Australian mainland to both Tasmania and New Guinea.

Our analysis using new high-resolution mapping of the seafloor shows that when sea levels were 75m or lower than present, a string of more than 100 habitable, resource-rich islands were present off the coast of northwest Australia.

These islands were directly visible from high points on the islands of Timor and Roti and as close as 87km.

This chain of now mostly submerged islands – the Sahul Banks – was almost 700km long. They represented a very large target for either accidental or purposeful arrival.

Northwest Australia showing a now submerged string of islands between Australia and Timor/Roti. The present coastline is shown as a black line. The coastline with sea level 75m lower than present is shown as a grey line. Robin Beaman

How difficult was it to get to Australia?

Combining modelled winds and ocean currents with particle trajectory modelling, we simulated voyages from three sites on the islands of Timor and Roti. This is similar to the approach used to model the movements of wreckage from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

In our model, we simulated the “launch” of 100 vessels from each site on February 1 each year for 15 years. The date was chosen to correspond to the main summer monsoon period when winds are generally blowing to the east-southeast, thereby maximising the chance of successful crossings.

Model results for vessel launches from Timor and Roti, showing ‘accidental’ drift voyaging where only wind and currents affect movement. Yellow dots show the islands closest to Timor/Roti. Scott Condie/Robin Beaman

Model results for vessel launches from Timor and Roti, showing ‘purposeful’ voyaging simulated by paddling. Yellow dots show the islands closest to Timor/Roti. Scott Condie/Robin Beaman

The results clearly indicate that accidental arrival by drifting alone is very unlikely at any time. But the addition of even modest paddling towards the Sahul Banks islands results in a high proportion of successful arrivals over four to seven days. The highest probability of a successful landfall is associated with launching points on western Timor and Roti.

Vessel colour begins to fade after six days of voyaging, indicating likely diminishing success rates. The present coastline is shown in dark grey. The coastline with sea level 75m lower than present is shown in light grey (Animation by Rebecca Gorton, CSIRO).

How many people did it take to colonise Australia?

Researchers have long speculated about how many people originally colonised Australia. Some have argued that Australia must have been colonised by accident, perhaps by just a few people.

Others have suggested a steady trickle of colonists. Estimates of the founding population have ranged from 1,000 to 3,000.

The genetic evidence shows that Australia was colonised in a single phase, perhaps at multiple locations, but with very limited gene flow after initial colonisation.

The diversity of mitochondrial DNA lineages found in Aboriginal populations allows us to estimate the minimum size of the original colonising population. Mitochondrial DNA is only inherited from mothers.

Aboriginal mitochondrial DNA diversity alone represents at least nine to ten separate lineages.

Assuming that every mitochondrial lineage was represented in the founding population by four to five females (such as a family group containing a mother and her sister, and two daughters) the currently known nine to ten lineages would equate to around 36-50 females.

This is a conservative estimate, as founding populations of fewer than ten females per lineage have a low chance of long-term survival due to variations in reproductive success.

If an overall, again conservative, female to male ratio of 1:1 is assumed for the colonising party, the inferred founding population would be around 72-100 people. It was likely much larger (perhaps 200-300) because of the strong potential for related family groups to share similar mitochondrial lineages, which would be underestimated as a single founding lineage.

Clearly, a population of even the minimum estimated size is unlikely to have arrived accidentally on Sahul.

What does it all mean?

A lot of earlier thinking about how people arrived in Australia was based on the assumption that the first modern humans to sweep out of Africa and colonise the distant lands of Australia and New Guinea were somehow more limited in their cognitive and technological capacities than later humans (that is, all of “us”).

Therefore, models routinely assumed that people island-hopped short distances rather than making long journeys, probably ending up in Australia by accident.

Our results show that colonisation of Australia and New Guinea was no accident. Colonisation of Australia was more likely achieved by purposeful and coordinated marine voyaging, undertaken in the knowledge that land existed to the south of Timor/Roti.

The crossing to Australia was two to three times longer than the multiple previous shorter crossings required to reach the islands of Timor and Roti. This last voyage to reach Australia would have required watercraft construction, sailing and navigation technology, planning ability, information sharing and provisions to sustain an open ocean voyage over four to seven days.

Purposeful voyaging on this scale clearly required advanced cognitive, linguistic, symbolic and technological capabilities. Critically, this finding places a unique global time-stamp on the cognitive abilities of our ancestors.

In the same way that we have underestimated the abilities of our human ancestors, we have underestimated the ability of early modern humans to plan, coordinate and undertake large-scale coordinated maritime voyaging across open water to reach Australia. The settling of Australia represents the earliest known maritime diaspora in the world.

The ConversationThis emerging picture of modern humans with advanced maritime capabilities deliberately settling the driest continent on the planet reminds us we still have much to learn about the complexity and adaptability of the First Australians.


By Sean Ulm, Deputy Director, ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, James Cook University; Alan Cooper, Director, Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide; Michael Bird, ARC Laureate Fellow, JCU Distinguished Professor and Landscapes Theme Leader for the ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, James Cook University; Peter Veth, Kimberley Foundation Ian Potter Chair in Rock Art and Professor of Australian Archaeology, Centre for Rock Art Research and Management, University of Western Australia; Robin Beaman, Research Fellow, College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, dan Scott Condie, Senior Principal Research Scientist, CSIRO

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

AIYA Links: 29 June

In the news

On the blog

Events

  • Sydney, 30 June – Pull on your winter woollies and come join AIYA NSW for a great day of sightseeing and hiking in the Blue Mountains! This is an awesome opportunity to meet new AIYA members while enjoying some spectacular scenery just outside of Sydney. Please register before 29 June.
  • Jakarta, 4 July – Come along and meet the new AIYA Jakarta committee at “Cepat Kaya 6.0”! It will be held at Lola – Espiritu y Libacion in South Jakarta from 7pm until end. Register here!
  • Jakarta, 7 July – “Joining global production networks: has Indonesia missed the boat?” will be the topic of the 2018 Hadi Soesastro Lecture by ANU Professor Prema-chandra Athukorala in Jakarta, Monday, 9 July at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Please register as space is limited!
  • Adelaide, 21 July – Gather your friends and come along to the Australia-Indonesia Association (AIA) of South Australia’s Gala Dinner and Wayang on Saturday 21 July at the Art Gallery to experience the tastes and sounds of the Spice Islands. Get your tickets here!

Opportunities

  • Join AIYA National! Enjoy our In The Blog section so far? We are now looking for Blog Editors to join the team! Read more about the role here and apply before 15 July.
  • Join AIYA ACT! The Chapter is looking for an events officer and general committee members, please contact act.president@aiya.org.au to express your interest.
  • Join AIYA East Indonesia! The Chapter in Makassar is looking for new committee members for the AGM which will be announced shortly. Go to https://tinyurl.com/yc5axgau to apply.
  • Study and intern in Indonesia in Summer 2019! Applications for ACICIS’ Professional Practica close 1 July! Placements are available in Law, Business, Creative Arts & Design, Sustainable Tourism and Journalism & Development Studies. $3,000 New Colombo Plan grants are available for eligible students.
  • For the first time, Ubud Writers & Readers Festival is offering international students the Early Bird rate for the 4-Day Main Program Pass. Early Birds are on sale 16 July, and available until the full program is announced in mid-Aug. Find out here for more information.
  • The Australian phase of Australia-Indonesia Youth Exchange Program (AIYEP) will be hosted in Melbourne and Bendigo in October and November this year which means the program is looking for host families and host organisations in both locations! If you would like to be a host family or a host organisation for one of the lovely 18 Indonesian participants please apply here.
  • If you would like to become an Australian AIYEP participant applications are now open until 18 July! To apply you must be between 21-25 years of age, be a team player and want to learn more about Indonesia. Ayo daftar!
  • Join talented students around the globe in the 2018 Universitas Hasanuddin International Cultural Program 2018 to be held 13-19 August 2018 in Makassar, Indonesia! Further information is available here. Registration closes 15 July 2018, so don’t hesitate to apply!
  • Applications for the AIC’s ReelOzInd! Short Film Festival are open! This year’s theme is ‘Youth’. Ayo, bikin film, yuk! Submission close 31 July.
  • Learning a language? Get Indonesian & English language help with UniBRIDGE Project.

Like what we do and want to join or support your local chapter to contribute to our exciting activities? Sign up as an AIYA member today!

AIYA Links: 22 June

Photo: 2018 Reuters
Photo: Reuters 2018

The Indonesian government is yet to honour its promise to allow United Nations high commissioner for human rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein to investigate human rights conditions in Papua and West Papua provinces. It is clear that parts of the Indonesian government remain hostile to the idea of greater transparency in the region.

Read more: https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/06/19/indonesia-shuts-out-un-rights-chief-papua

In the news

  • Up to 192 people are believed to have drowned after a tourist ferry sank in Indonesia on Monday evening. More than 200 people are thought to have crammed aboard the small, rickety vessel to make the 40-minute journey across Lake Toba in North Sumatra.
  • Indonesia has seen steady economic growth over the last two decades, yet the manufacturing sector has continuously underperformed. This week’s Talking Indonesia podcast explores the decline in manufacturing and also what Indonesia can do to strengthen the industry going forward.
  • Before Indonesia sinks in its own notoriously mismanaged plastic waste, three young researchers from Gadjah Mada University have been developing a smart car equipped with technology to convert plastic to motor fuel.
  • Indonesia has received a World Bank loan of US$100 million for its National Urban Water Supply Project. The loan will enable the provision of water supply and sanitation to six million people in the country through promoting access to safe water and improving the performance of water service providers in underserved areas.
  • Dubbed the “Floating School”, the boat routinely collects dozens of teens and children from small islands in Pangkep, Sulawesi. The initiative is part of a non-formal education program created to empower youngsters who live in the small islands around the region.
  • The deep peatland forest in Indonesian Borneo is home to one of the world’s largest remaining populations of endangered orangutans. However, the habitat is under threat despite changes in the law designed to protect it.
  • Iwan Sunito left Indonesia nearly three decades ago to become one of Australia’s top property developers. Now, the Australian Property King has returned to Indonesia, joining forces with Jakarta-based resorts operator Pembangunan Jaya Ancol to develop a Rp 7 trillion apartment complex in North Jakarta.
  • Indonesia’s 260 million citizens each throw out an average of almost 300 kilograms of food annually. Now, an initiative A Blessing to Share aims to take a bite out of food waste, one wedding at a time.

On the blog

Events

  • Sydney, 23 June – Get a healthy dose of Indonesian dance, food and culture at the ASYIK Bazaar 2018 from 11:00am. AIYA NSW will have a stall at the event so please pop by and say hi!
  • Perth, 24 June – AIYA Western Australia is hosting a screening of the incredible Indonesian documentary, Banda: The Dark Forgotten Trail at 3:30pm, University of Western Australia. Grab your tickets here to secure your spot!
  • Melbourne, 24 June – Love the AFL? Love AIYA? Join the Victoria Chapter to watch Collingwood v Carlton at the MCG this Sunday. Limited tickets available, register here if you’d like to come along.
  • Sydney, 25 June – From 13-15 August, the Conference of Indonesian Diaspora Youth will take place in Jakarta, open to Indonesian diaspora and Indonesianists from around the world. Come along to the KJRI in Sydney from 6:30pm to hear more about the conference and how you can get involved.
  • Hobart, 26 June – Join AIYA Tasmania at their first Language Exchange! A great way to improve your Indonesian and English skills, all language levels welcomed and encouraged to come.
  • Melbourne, 26 June – What’s happening in the Australia-Indonesia higher education space? On the 26 June, the Australia-Indonesia Business Council (AIBC) Victoria is hosting an education panel with an array of fantastic speakers keen to unpick some of the key issues in a critical sector for Indonesia. Click here for tickets and more information!
  • Sydney, 27 June – Join Sydney Southeast Asia Centre (SSEAC) Postdoc Dr Jess Melvin as she talks about her book, The Army and the Indonesian Genocide, with The Australian Human Rights Institute and the Diplomacy Training Program from 1 – 2pm at the University of New South Wales Law Building. Register here!
  • Canberra, 28 June – The 2018 Indonesia Update book, “Indonesia is the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty” is being launched on 28 June 2018 at 5:30pm. The book will be launched by The Hon Chris Bowen MP. Please register through the link!
  • Sydney, 30 June Pull on your winter woollies and come join AIYA NSW for a great day of sightseeing and hiking in the Blue Mountains! This is an awesome opportunity to meet new AIYA members while enjoying some spectacular scenery just outside of Sydney. Please register before 29 June.

Opportunities

  • Join AIYA ACT! The Chapter is looking for an events officer and general committee members, please contact act.president@aiya.org.au to express your interest.
  • Are you a masters student in literature, history, computer science or area studies? The Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KILTV) are offering 3-month research internships in ‘Digital humanities and traditional Indonesian literature’. Deadline for applications is 28 June.
  • Saksara, an Indonesia-based organisation dedicated to facilitating international research collaboration and transnational education, is searching for a new Research & Communications Associate in Bandung. Details attached. Be quick, applications will close at the end of June!
  • Study and intern in Indonesia in Summer 2019! Applications for ACICIS’ Professional Practica close 1 July! Placements are available in Law, Business, Creative Arts & Design, Sustainable Tourism and Journalism & Development Studies. $3,000 New Colombo Plan grants are available for eligible students.
  • For the first time, Ubud Writers & Readers Festival is offering international students the Early Bird rate for the 4-Day Main Program Pass. Early Birds are on sale 16 July, and available until the full program is announced in mid-Aug. Find out here for more information.
  • The Australian phase of Australia-Indonesia Youth Exchange Program (AIYEP) will be hosted in Melbourne and Bendigo in October and November this year which means the program is looking for host families and host organisations in both locations! If you would like to be a host family or a host organisation for one of the lovely 18 Indonesian participants please apply here.
  • If you would like to become an Australian AIYEP participant applications are now open until 18 July! To apply you must be between 21-25 years of age, be a team player and want to learn more about Indonesia. Ayo daftar!
  • Applications for the AIC’s ReelOzInd! Short Film Festival are open! This year’s theme is ‘Youth’. Ayo, bikin film, yuk! Submission close 31 July.
  • Learning a language? Get Indonesian & English language help with UniBRIDGE Project.

Like what we do and want to join or support your local chapter to contribute to our exciting activities? Sign up as an AIYA member today!

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: Facebook account manager Anastasia Pavlovic

Welcome back to Spotlight on an AIYA Member! In this regular series, we talk to a different AIYA Member from either Indonesia or Australia to hear their story. Our target this week is former AIYA Web and Video Officer and avid tech supporter Anastasia Pavlovic.

What do you do?

I am currently a Small-Medium Business Account Manager at Facebook in Singapore, helping Australian and New Zealand businesses gain better results from their marketing strategies on the platform. I graduated from the University of Sydney with a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in Indonesian Studies and Sociology.

What is your favourite place to visit in Indonesia?

Indonesia has so many ridiculously beautiful places, it is so hard to just pick one! I would have to say that my favourite is a tie between Yogyakarta and the Ijen crater in East Java. Yogyakarta for the rich culture, friendly people and Bakpia; Ijen crater because I’ve never felt so small and intrigued in my life by such a natural landmark.

Most delicious meal?

My all-time favourite meal is sayur asemjagung manis, terong, kacang panjang… it’s such a simple dish but those spices make it taste so good!

What is your favourite Indonesian word?

Matahari. I love the literal translation of this word which illustrates quite an image: Mata = eye, hari = day. The eye of the day!

Fan of any TV shows?

Tetangga Masa Gitu? A show that follows the daily hilarious lives of two couples – one being married for ten years, the other being newly married. Has helped me improve my bahasa gaul!

How did you first become interested in Indonesia?

I’ve been exposed to Indonesia since I was young, given how my mother is Indonesian. It wasn’t until I turned eight when I first went to Indonesia that I actually wanted to become part of this world. When that humidity hit me as I emerged from Soekarno-Hatta Airport, I immediately fell in love with the country.

Although I come from a household with both Serbian and Indonesian languages, I only spoke English at home and ate an interesting fusion of foods. It wasn’t until I was in university that I finally got the chance to properly rekindle my love for Indonesia by learning about the language and culture.

My Indonesian lecturers Bu Novi and Bu Dyah (who are some of the most beautiful, passionate people I’ve ever met!) also made this experience worthwhile.

How did you get involved with AIYA?

After coming back from a short study tour in Batam during my second year, I knew I really wanted to get involved in the Indonesian community. I started to attend a couple of AIYA NSW events, but wanted to get involved even further in the organization. I found a volunteer position open for a Web and Video Officer on the AIYA website, applied and got it! It was great being at the pulse of the organisation, updating the site with information on the various chapters.

Meeting Ada Apa Dengan Cinta? star Nicolas Saputra and Sultan of Yogyakarta Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X are by far the highlights of being part of AIYA.

Any hopes for the bilateral relationship?

Food brings people together. I have a lot of hope that a cool chef will create a cool fusion dish representing the bilateral relationship. I’m thinking a meat pie made of tempe, pavlova made with cendol, or maybe Vegemite and durian on toast!

What do you like most about AIYA?

AIYA provides such a good opportunity for people who love Indonesia to gather together and talk all things Indo! It was inspiring meeting people who were doing incredible things to strengthen the relationship, such as writing books, hosting comedy shows or studying in the other country. It truly shaped my university experience and brought me out of my comfort zone.

Living now in Singapore, I really miss the tight community and all the events! There will always be a soft spot in my heart for AIYA.

Sum up your AIYA member experience in three words.

Exciting, interesting and keren!

Read more AIYA Member Spotlight interviews here!

AIYA Links: 15 June

In the news

  • Indonesia has beaten the Maldives in a secret ballot to determine the new five members of the UN Security Council. Starting January 1 2019, they will join the U.N.’s most powerful body alongside Germany, Belgium, South Africa and the Dominican Republic.
  • It is less than a year before Indonesia hold its first ever simultaneous national legislative and presidential elections. An investigation into factors that were important for Jokowi’s 2014 victory show economic voting is still important, with voters living in villages with positive economic conditions such as good infrastructure more likely to support him.
  • Decentralisation was first introduced in Indonesian in 1999 as part of efforts to improve public services as well as accelerate government accountability and transparency. Now, decentralisation in education is considered key to making the country’s school system more accommodating to local needs.
  • The challenge of providing connectivity to all of Indonesia is undoubtedly greatest at Idul Fitri, with millions of Indonesian Muslims leaving for their hometowns. To support the Idul Fitri exodus, the Jokowi government has accelerated a number of infrastructure projects at airports, seaports and toll roads across the country.
  • Indonesia will be home to the largest tidal power plant in the world. Located in the Larantuka Straits on the island of Flores in eastern Indonesia, it is expected to provide energy for at least 100,000 people.
  • The completion of the Ahmad Yani International Airport in Semarang, Central Java signifies another infrastructure milestone for Indonesia. Completed six months ahead of its initial deadline, it is the first eco-friendly airport in the country.
  • New Mandala explores a period of Indonesian architecture in the 1950s – 60s called ‘Jengki’ which is now enjoying a revival in contemporary Indonesia. It is famous for its unusual shapes such as pentagons, asymmetrical roofs and cut-out doors.
  • Indonesian-born chemical engineer from the University of NSW, Professor Rose Amal, has received one of the Queen’s Birthday top honours for her work into cost-efficient ways to mitigate the impact of greenhouse gases that are causing climate change.
  • The Australian Consortium for ‘In-Country’ Indonesian Studies (ACICIS) has released its’ 2017 Annual Report. The report outlines recent historical trends in Australian outbound mobility to Indonesia and contextualises ACICIS’ contribution within the broader national picture. Download the report here!

Events

  • Perth, 24 June – AIYA Western Australia is hosting a screening of the incredible Indonesian documentary, Banda: The Dark Forgotten Trail at 7:30pm, University of Western Australia. Grab your tickets using the link to secure your spot!
  • Melbourne, 26 June – What’s happening in the Australia-Indonesia higher education space? On the 26 June, the Australia-Indonesia Business Council (AIBC) Victoria is hosting an education panel with an array of fantastic speakers keen to unpick some of the key issues in a critical sector for Indonesia. Click here for tickets and more information!
  • Canberra, 28 June – The 2018 Indonesia Update book, “Indonesia is the new world: globalisation, nationalism and sovereignty” is being launched on 28 June 2018 at 5:30pm. The book will be launched by The Hon Chris Bowen MP. Please register through the link!

Opportunities

  • Join AIYA QLD! The Chapter is looking for an Events Officer, Sunshine Coast. If you’re interested in joining the team please email president@aiya.org.au.
  • The Asian Studies Association of Australia is seeking self-motivated, energetic students to volunteer at its premier, biennial conference on the 3-5 July at the University of Sydney. Click here for more information about the positions and email conference@sydney.edu.au by 14 June if you are interested!
  • Are you a masters student in literature, history, computer science or area studies? The Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KILTV) are offering 3-month research internships in ‘Digital humanities and traditional Indonesian literature’. Deadline for applications is 28 June.
  • Saksara, an Indonesia-based organisation dedicated to facilitating international research collaboration and transnational education, is searching for a new Research & Communications Associate in Bandung. Details attached. Be quick, applications will close at the end of June!
  • Applications for ACICIS’ Professional Practica close 1 July! Placements available in Law, Business, Creative Arts & Design, Sustainable Tourism, Journalism & Development Studies. Study and intern in Indonesia in Summer 2019. $3,000 New Colombo Plan grants are available for eligible students.
  • For the first time, Ubud Writers & Readers Festival is offering international students the Early Bird rate for the 4-Day Main Program Pass. Early Birds are on sale 16 July, and available until the full program is announced in mid-Aug. Find out here for more information.
  • The Australian phase of Australia-Indonesia Youth Exchange Program (AIYEP) will be hosted in Melbourne and Bendigo in October and November this year which means the program is looking for host families and host organisations in both locations! If you would like to be a host family or a host organisation for one of the lovely 18 Indonesian participants please apply here.
  • If you would like to become an Australian AIYEP participant applications are now open until 18 July! To apply you must be between 21-25 years of age, be a team player and want to learn more about Indonesia. Ayo daftar!
  • Applications for the AIC’s ReelOzInd! Short Film Festival are now open! This year’s theme is ‘Youth’. Ayo, bikin film, yuk! Submission close 31 July.
  • Learning a language? Get Indonesian & English language help with UniBRIDGE Project.

Like what we do and want to join or support your local chapter to contribute to our exciting activities? Sign up as an AIYA member today!

AIYA Links: 8 June

Getty Images

The Sultan of Yogyakarta holds a powerful political and spiritual position in the region. Now, it seems the Sultan is manoeuvring to make his eldest daughter his heir, representing a breakaway from long-standing tradition and sparking feuds among members of the royal court.

In the news

  • Indonesia has long been criticised for the severe mistreatment of its easternmost provinces of Papua and West Papua. Despite simmering independence efforts in Papua, human rights groups continue to report high levels of conflict between pro-independence groups and the Indonesian state.
  • Lax smoking laws make Indonesia a disneyland for Big Tobacco. With tobacco companies continuing to influence and target Indonesian youth, it seeks to threaten the country’s potential and future productivity.
  • On Tuesday, the Indonesian Corrections office confirmed that Bali Nine member Tan Duc Thanh Nguyen had passed away in hospital. He is the third member of the group to die after Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, who were executed in 2015.
  • Last Thursday, Jokowi met with participants of Indonesia’s longest running human rights project, Kamisan (“Thursdays”) for the first time. Rather than signal a change of heart toward Kamisan’s appeals for justice, Ken Setiawan writes Jokowi’s meeting merely gave an artificial impression of interest in Indonesia’s human rights agenda.
  • The level of involvement of IS leaders in coordinating the recent string of terrorist attacks across Indonesia still remains unclear. Meanwhile, it has also raised questions about whether Indonesia is facing a new brand of terrorism.
  • India and Indonesia have signed an agreement for closer military ties. Whilst it was not specifically mentioned, it is suggested the deal was driven by the two countries’ desire to push back against China’s military expansion in the South China Sea.
  • Australian Consulate-General to Bali alongside Trash Hero Kertalangu and Eco-Bali Recycling held a cleanup movement in Biaung Beach, East Denpasar last Saturday. Joined by 100 volunteers, the cleanup was the first activity of “Waste to Wealth”, a week-long program promoting eco-friendly tourism in Bali and Nusa Tenggara.

On the blog

  • Many parents consider that raising their children to speak more than one language will give their offspring an edge over monolingual kids. To compete in a globalised world, future generations are required to master at least two languages. On the blog this week, Novi Rahayu Restuningrum from Universitas Yarsi shares her experience of raising bilingual children.
  • This week, we delve into the AIYA blog archives, revisiting Oki Mustopa’s tips and insights in applying for a work and holiday visa to Australia and how to deal with the challenges involved in living and working in Australia.

Events

AIYA are still hosting screenings of the incredible Indonesian documentary, Banda: The Dark Forgotten Trail, across Australia.

  • Hobart – TONIGHT: 8 June, 7pm, Centenary Lecture Theatre, University of Tasmania
  • Darwin – Rescheduled! Details TBA
  • Perth – 24 June, 7:30pm, University of Western Australia

Grab your tickets using the above links to secure your spot! For any questions about any of the screenings, please contact your local chapter.

Other events:

  • Melbourne, 26 June – What’s happening in the Australia-Indonesia higher education space? On the 26 June, the Australia-Indonesia Business Council (AIBC) Victoria is hosting an education panel with an array of fantastic speakers keen to unpick some of the key issues in a critical sector for Indonesia. Click here for tickets and more information!

Opportunities

  • Join AIYA QLD! The Chapter is looking for an Events Officer, Sunshine Coast. If you’re interested in joining the team please email qld.president@aiya.org.au.
  • The Asian Studies Association of Australia is seeking self-motivated, energetic students to volunteer at its premier, biennial conference on the 3-5 July at the University of Sydney. Click here for more information about the positions and email asaa2018.conference@sydney.edu.au by 14 June if you are interested!
  • Indonesia Development Forum (Jakarta, 10-11 July 2018) is hosting a competition to tackle regional disparities across the Indonesian archipelago. You must submit either a blog, vlog, or infographic which discusses how you would overcome regional inequalities (#AtasiKesenjangan) in Indonesia.
  • Are you a masters student in literature, history, computer science or area studies? The Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KILTV) are offering 3-month research internships in ‘Digital humanities and traditional Indonesian literature’. Deadline for applications is 28 June.
  • Saksara, an Indonesia-based organisation dedicated to facilitating international research collaboration and transnational education, is searching for a new Research & Communications Associate in Bandung. Details attached. Be quick, applications close end of June!
  • The Australian phase of Australia-Indonesia Youth Exchange Program (AIYEP) will be hosted in Melbourne and Bendigo in October and November this year which means the program is looking for host families and host organisations in both locations! If you would like to be a host family or a host organisation for one of the lovely 18 Indonesian participants please apply here.
  • If you would like to become an Australian AIYEP participant applications are now open until 18 July! To apply you must be between 21-25 years of age, be a team player and want to learn more about Indonesia. Ayo daftar!
  • Applications for the AIC’s ReelOzInd! Short Film Festival are now open! This year’s theme is ‘Youth’. Ayo, bikin film, yuk! Submissions close 31 July.
  • Learning a language? Get Indonesian & English language help with UniBRIDGE Project.

Like what we do and want to join or support your local chapter to contribute to our exciting activities? Sign up as an AIYA member today!

Raising bilingual children in Indonesia: the strategies

Many parents consider that raising their children to speak more than one language will give their offspring an edge over monolingual kids. To compete in a globalised world, future generations are required to master at least two languages, one of which is spoken internationally.

By Novi Rahayu Restuningrum, Universitas Yarsi

I have raised bilingual children. My children, aged 17 and 11, are proficient in both the Indonesian and English languages and can switch with ease between these for certain topics.

Raising bilingual children: a choice

I always wanted my children to master two languages. I started speaking with my daughter in both English and Indonesian language when she was six years old.

But I often asked myself what was the best way to make my children speak English as well as Indonesians speak in their mother tongue.

I realise that raising children bilingually requires a condition
where my children can learn to speak English without interruption. When I received a scholarship to pursue a PhD in education in Melbourne, Australia, I brought my children with me between 2011 and 2015.

Frequent exposure is the key

In Indonesia, raising children in two languages (or more) is not a new thing. The vast majority of Indonesian people are bilingual or multilingual by default, because they speak at least two languages: Indonesian and their ethnic language (native language). Thus, the practice of acquiring a second language is ingrained, without people planning or thinking about it.

Exposure to language is an important factor in learning a language. Acquiring foreign languages is more difficult than mastering ethnic languages, as the latter are spoken everywhere. Foreign languages are not commonly spoken or heard.

A lot of people learn English in a structured format in classrooms and forums. However, they may acquire knowledge about the language but fail to use the language properly in this formal setting.

Contrast this to ethnic languages that people hear in their daily lives. People start to get exposed to Indonesian language from the time they enter school because the language is used as the medium of interaction in formal contexts. The exposure to ethnic language happens since infancy, with the language being used as a media of communication among family members.

English is a foreign language that the vast majority of Indonesians do not speak. This results in children’s low exposure to the language.

As learning English needs to be done in a structured context, the natural aspect of the language use has decreased. But children can still acquire English, subject to their exposure to the language.

Formal and informal contexts

A bilingual child usually gains her ability to speak two languages through exposure in both formal and informal settings.

In the family context, parents are the key factor.

In mastering English as the second language for children, parents need to provide more contexts for exposing their children to English to ensure the process of learning the language happens naturally.

Here are at least three strategies that parents can implement in raising bilingual children. The strategies are adopted from methods introduced by American linguist Suzanne Romaine in her book Bilingualism.

One parent, one language

The method applies when one of the parents speaks English most of the time (if not all the time) and the other parent speaks Indonesian or an ethnic language.

This will give the children simultaneous natural exposure to both languages. To do this, the parent needs to be competent in English.

Home versus school

Under this method, parents can tell children to speak a certain language in a certain context. For example, children are required to speak English in school, while at home they are encouraged to speak Indonesian. This context-based, one-language strategy may be implemented conversely.

I have seen many parents who are incompetent in English send their children to schools where English is the main language because they are incapable of teaching English at home.

Natural conversion

The third way that parents may choose is providing contexts where both languages (Indonesian and English) are used. Parents themselves switch languages, and they need to do this from when their children are born, so they are exposed to the languages from infancy. Again, to do this, parents need to be able to use English proficiently.

The strategies are there for parents to choose for their children to acquire English without losing their Indonesian and ethnic languages.

The ConversationA phenomenon of children who are exposed to English but are not able to speak local languages properly has prompted debates on the best way to teach English to children as it may later cause communication barriers. No parent wants this to happen. Therefore, they need to be wise in exposing their children to the languages.


By Novi Rahayu Restuningrum, Lecturer in English, Universitas Yarsi

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.