AIYA Links: 18 August

In the news

  • AIYA member, Jaime Berrill, helps us celebrate Independence day with this short mix of tracks by talented Indonesian artists.
  • In an address to parliament ahead of Thursday’s independence day, President Jokowi said that the country needed to pull together to meet the threat of extremism and safeguard a constitution that enshrines religious freedom and diversity.
  • Three former presidents joined President Jokowi in celebrating Indonesia’s Independence Day at the State Palace.
  • Working towards a culture of respect the Australia-Indonesia Centre’s Helen Fletcher-Kennedy considers modern Australian, Indonesian and Indigenous attitudes.
  • Many Indonesians remember the New Order regime that Suharto led from 1967 to 1998 for corruption and repression, including a brutal campaign of anti-communist purges that historians describe as one of the worst atrocities of the 20th century. But in a country where open discussion of his rule remains taboo, the General Suharto Memorial Museum celebrates him as a kindly father and heroic nation-builder. To some, this is a rewriting of history that’s too much to bear.

On the blog

  • What is gamelan jegog? The instrument has been encouraging Australians to visit and experience more than just the common tourist attractions in Bali. Read on for more information from Jane Ahlstrand (originally published on the JembARTan blog).

Opportunities

  • Volunteer apps are now open for the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival 2017 (UWRF17).
  • Applications close 1 September for ACICIS’ Indonesian Language Short Course 2017/2018 sessions. Details here.

2 Weeks left – apply for NAILA now

Apply today for NAILA 2017 – applications have been extended until 1 September for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

Enjoying a fun Bali getaway? Head off the beaten track with gamelan jegog (JembARTan)

What is gamelan jegog? The instrument has been encouraging Australians to visit and experience more than just the common tourist attractions in Bali. Read on for more information from Jane Ahlstrand (originally published on the JembARTan blog).

Since the 1970s, a quick trip to Bali has become a way of life for many Australians. Until now, however, the majority of Australian tourists still tend to wear the same beaten path along Kuta, Seminyak and Nusa Dua with a few who ‘escape’ to the yoga haven of Ubud. In reality, there are plenty of other destinations in Bali worth visiting beyond the limits of these highly congested touristic areas. These days, the ‘Cultural Tourism’ movement has taken off in Bali with the aim of finding a way to pry tourists away from the walls of the villa and out of their comfort zone. This movement also draws upon the creativity of the Balinese people as a powerful cultural asset. According to Adi Hartawan, a young artist who now runs a successful cultural tourism program in Jembrana Regency, this new movement in the industry has the potential to deliver positive results for the local population as well as Australian tourists.

Overseas visitors trying jegog for the first time.

In 2015, Adi joined forces with his elder, I Wayan Gama Astawa to establish a music and dance studio specialising in the arts of Jembrana Regency, named Sanggar Adi Gama. With meticulous care, they developed a program especially tailored for overseas tourists interested in getting to know more about the distinctive music of Jembrana Regency. Located on Bali’s west coast, Jembrana has its own traditions, far different to the arts and culture of other areas of Bali. This difference endows Jembrana with a unique cultural and artistic identity.

Adi Hartawan and I Wayan Gama Astawa.

Jegog is a bamboo musical instrument played in an ensemble. Together, these instruments produce a sweet and resonating sound, unlike the cacophonous sounds of the gamelan. This instrument is associated explicitly with Jembrana Regency, known as the home of jegog. In Jembrana, jegog draws the interest of overseas visitors who venture out to the west in the hopes of learning more about its intricacies. According to Professor I Nyoman Darma Putra from the Faculty of Literature and Culture at Udayana University, the cultivation of the tourism industry in Jembrana aligns with the emergence of jegog as a cultural asset. “Jegog and tourism have a reciprocal relationship,” says Professor Darma. “Jegog has developed in line with the growth of tourism, while at the same time, the tourism industry gains a new form of entertainment through the music and dance of the jegog,” he explains.

The proses of teaching international guests about jegog is no easy feat and requires a special educational technique focusing on detail. “The most important thing for a teacher is to be patient as we teach others who have never ever played a gamelan instrument,” says Adi. “First of all, I explain the definition of gamelan jegog, and then I tell them a little about my personal experience when I first started learning this instrument so they feel more interested and comfortable when encountering the new instrument,” he adds.

With great care, Adi then explains the correct technique for holding the mallet, proceeded by an introduction to the different sounds as well as how to hit the instrument correctly; moving from one instrument to the other. Finally, he gives his students a simple and easy song to play so they can enjoy the process of making music on the jegog. “Aside from teaching the correct technique, a teacher should also pay attention to the response from students so they don’t get bored and disengage. I always manage the time. When to take a break an when to study – because if I just keep on teaching, I’m sure they will get tired and lose focus,” he stays. “So, in that sense, I have to invite them to laugh, making a quiz or some jokes so they relax before moving on to the next stage in the lesson. I also invite them to visit some local tourist sites like the waterfall, ricefields, the river and hills around the studio,” he adds.

Adi with some keen students.

According to Adi, the process of sharing knowledge also helps to build a stronger relationship between countries and people. “Because I don’t just give them knowledge of music, but also my culture. From my students, I also gain knowledge about their own cultures,” says Adi. “Tourists who visit my sanggar feel very happy and comfortable here. When the time comes for them to return home, they feel sad because they say they want to stay here in the forest,” he adds.

Jembrana is still renowned for its natural environment.

In future, Adi hopes that the people of Jembrana can make a living from their artistic activities. “I hope local arts like jegog from Jembrana can gain a stronger reputation abroad, including in Australia. I hope that overseas visitors who come to Bali don’t just go and hang out in Kuta or Nusa Dua but also visit, Jembrana, especially my sanggar, Adi Gama,” says Adi. Jembrana Regency is blessed with a beautiful environment that has not yet been touched by large scale industrial development. “The natural resouces in this regency provide an opportunity to the local populations to make the most of what nature offers in a useful and respectful way,” says Adi.

Discover more about Indonesian arts and culture in Australia on the JembARTan blog.

AIYA Links: 11 August

In the news

On the blog

Events

  • Lombok, Melbourne, Canberra, Newcastle and Sydney, 11-27 August, Modern Australian jazz meets Indonesian traditional percussion in a tour of the Julian Banks Group feat. Indonesian percussionist Cepi Kusmiadi.

Opportunities

  • Volunteer apps are now open for the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival 2017 (UWRF17).

Apply for NAILA

Apply today for NAILA 2017 – applications have been extended until 1 September for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

What is UniBRIDGE Project – and how can you benefit?

Membership of AIYA offers Indonesian and Australian youth numerous benefits, but perhaps one of the lesser-known advantages is free access to the UniBRIDGE Project online language exchange platform. But what exactly is UniBRIDGE Project? Chris Hall gives us a rundown.

What is the core philosophy behind UniBRIDGE Project?

UniBRIDGE Project can be summed up in three key words: connect, understand, and interact. The idea behind UniBRIDGE Project is that if Australians and Indonesians get together and interact with each other on a regular basis then misconceptions are smashed, barriers are overcome and friendships are formed. This is true even if the regular interactions are via web-conferencing software. UniBRIDGE Project overcomes the tyranny of distance (and costs of travel) and allows Australians and Indonesians to share language and culture through online technologies. It is improving the bilateral relationship at a grassroots level.

Screenshot of the UniBRIDGE Project web-conferencing platform. Image: Chris Hall

How did UniBRIDGE Project come about?

The basic idea behind UniBRIDGE Project is to allow Australians and Indonesians to engage in language and intercultural exchanges using the latest educational software. Participants can engage with each other from anywhere that has an Internet connection and they are also supported by a dedicated team and provided language and cultural education material.

UniBRIDGE Project started its journey in 2012 as a pilot program inspired by Asia Education Foundation’s school BRIDGE project. The working committee behind the brainstorming of the project included the likes of David Hill and Aaron O’Shannessy and was ultimately founded and led by Dr. Richard Curtis at Charles Darwin University (now at University of Sunshine Coast). Back then it was called Tertiary Bridge Project and I was a student studying externally from Sydney.

Since then it has become permanent and I transitioned from student, to mentor, to volunteer, until in 2016 I was asked to take over the management of the program. Since 2012, the program has grown from involving one Australian and one Indonesian university, to students from nine Australian universities and five Indonesian universities, as well as AIYA members.

UniBRIDGE Project participants in Australia. Photo: Chris Hall

Tell us about your own Indonesia journey – how formative were these experiences?

My Indonesian in-country study trips have left quite an impact on me, and they really did shape my motivation to make an effective organisation that builds bridges at the grassroots level.

My first Indonesian in-country trip involved three weeks in Kupang, East Nusa Tenggara (NTT), and three weeks in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara (NTB). It was the early days of UniBRIDGE Project but I instantly felt at ease in Kupang because I had a local support network of friends who I had been speaking to via UniBRIDGE Project for the previous six months or more.

I first realised the value of the UniBRIDGE Project experience while in Lombok. I couldn’t help notice the contrast. In Lombok, there was very little cross-cultural interaction, despite the fact that the Australian students were in their target country. Most of the Australian students mainly spoke to restaurant staff, taxi drivers and hotel workers. This experience highlighted the value of regular, real-time, contact with overseas peers – especially when eventually travelling in country.

UniBRIDGE Project participants gather together in Kupang. Photo: Daniel Hall

You also teach?

Yes, I have been an English language teacher since 2007. I have taught all levels of English and several specialist courses including Cambridge exam courses, English for Academic Purposes, and Business English. I also have experience teaching and developing learning material for French and Indonesian.

What other experiences have you sought in the Australia-Indonesia space?

I studied a Diploma of Languages (Indonesian) which involved a couple of in-country study trips. I’ve also promoted and sold crafts made from traditional tenun ikat from NTT. This idea arose in UniBRIDGE Project while chatting to one of my early language partners, whose family makes and sells these craft items in Kupang. So we worked together to get things going and now people in the US, Germany and Australia enjoy handmade tenun ikat products from Kupang. The idea is to support the local artisan community in NTT in some small way through promoting small business.

What is the best part of coordinating UniBRIDGE Project?

The best thing is seeing students develop and learn. This is both in terms of language and cultural knowledge. I like seeing Indonesian and Australians finally realise that they have different ideas of how to use the word ‘semester’, for example. And it is nice to see Indonesian students finally stop using Pak, or other Indonesian honorifics, when speaking English. And with recorded language exchanges, we can see clear development of language speaking and, importantly, increased confidence.

Australian students visiting their UniBRIDGE Project friends in Kupang. Photo: Qrezpy Pariamalinya

How would you like to see UniBRIDGE Project or similar tools used in the future?

UniBRIDGE Project relies heavily on online communication technology. This technology is only going to become more widely used, especially as more people become connected to increasingly better quality Internet. With the right kind of organisation and management, the potential for education and cross-border interaction are huge.

Already, through UniBRIDGE Project, hundreds of Australian and Indonesian university students are able to see each other, and speak to each other in real time. Imagine how would the bilateral relationship would develop if tens of thousands of Australians and Indonesians interacted with each other every week?

Finally, where can we go to find out more?

To find out more about UniBRIDGE Project visit the website here. And if you’d like to improve your English or Indonesian, check out Chris’ free language learning worksheets.

AIYA Links: 4 August

In the news

  • Mount Sinabung in north Sumarta erupted on Wednesday, sending clouds of ash and hot smoke 4km high.
  • In the New York Times, read about the fishermen from the small whaling village of Lamalera, in eastern Indonesia, that have been hunting whales for centuries and continue to do so with permission from the Indonesian government. But conservationists are calling for a stricter regulation of this practice.
  • ‘Instagram is driving Indonesia’s wedding wars to dizzying heights.’ Gain an insight to weddings in modern Indonesia in Vice.
  • Facebook will open an office in Jakarta this month, as part of the requirements for its operation in Indonesia.
  • Meet Indonesia’s nudist community (bahasa Indonesia).

On the blog

  • To celebrate the 72nd Independence Day of Indonesia in August, the PPIA Victoria has organised a comedy musical drama called Temu Lawak (Teater Muda Langkah Awal Kemerdekaan). We chat to Kevin Joshua, the project manager of Temu Lawak 2017.
  • This weekend the Indonesia Garudas are heading to Melbourne to join the AFL International Cup from August 5-19 2017.

Events

Opportunities

  • Do you use dwibahasa on social media? An AIYA Masters student is looking for participants in a study investigating language behaviours of using Indonesian and English on social media. Take part in the survey today.
  • Volunteer apps are now open for the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival 2017 (UWRF17).

Apply for NAILA

Apply today for NAILA 2017 – applications have been extended until 1 September for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

Indonesia Garudas Headed to Melbourne to Join 2017 AFL International Cup August 5-19

The Indonesia Garudas, a team of young Indonesian footballers from clubs, schools and orphanages across Indonesia, are heading to Melbourne to join the AFL International Cup from August 5-19 2017.

The AFL International Cup is held every three years. In 2014, Papua New Guinea won the men’s final while Canada won the women’s final.

This Sunday 6th August, the opening round of the 2017 AFL International Cup (AFLIC) will be played at Melbourne’s Royal Park. Reining 2016 AFL Asia All-Asian Cup winners, the Indonesia Garudas are ready for the 2017 tournament.

The 2017 AFLIC is comprised of 18 men’s teams and eight women’s teams competing. The men’s fixture will be played across two divisions, and 6 of the eight teams in the new Division 2 are from Asia. All teams will play a total of 4 round games with 1v2, 3v4, etc. Grand Finals to follow.

The Indonesia Garudas are set to make their mark in this year’s AFLIC after winning the inaugural AFL Asia All-Asian Cup in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam in October 2016.

Indonesia Garudas Win All-Asian Cup 2016

More recently in May 2017, through sponsors, raffles, selling hats and t-shirts they raised enough money to send some players to play in China. They joined the curtain raiser match to the AFL’s first ever match in China, between Port Adelaide vs. Gold Coast.

As the 2017 AFLIC approaches, the Indonesia Garudas are keen to do one better and take on the best teams in the world.

Check out this video of the Indonesia Garudas to hear their story.

The Garudas have worked hard to get to Melbourne this year fundraising through Fundrazr to meet costs for a place to train and equipment to train with, passports, visas, flights, accommodation, warm clothes, and new playing gear.

The Indonesian Garudas will open their campaign for the Cup against Sri Lanka on Sunday.
You can catch the Garudas at the below matches:

Indonesia vs. Sri Lanka – Sun 6th Aug 9.30am, Royal Park – Western Oval
Croatia vs. Indonesia – Wed 9th Aug 11.45am,
Indonesia vs. China – Sat 12th Aug 12.00pm, Diggers Rest
Semi finals – Tues 15th Aug
Grand finals – Fri 18th Aug

The Indonesia Garudas v Team China game on Saturday 12 August in the outer-Melbournian suburb of Diggers Rest is a big game for fans of footy in Asia and is crucial for both teams if they want to challenge for the 1v2 Grand Final.

“Having seen first hand the improvement in Asia’s local players and knowing how hard these guys have been training for this occasion, I’m confident we will see a massive improvement in skills and game awareness from teams like Indonesia and China where the local development programs managed by our clubs are strongest.” – AFL Asia President Grant Keys

The Garudas narrowly defeated China at last year’s inaugural All-Asian Cup, but Team China showed their improvement at the Shanghai Cup in May 2017 beating the combined Asian Lions team that featured many of the Indonesia Garudas players.

Through AFL Indonesia, some of the Indonesia Garudas players now have jobs, teaching AFL football in local schools and orphanages. They run free weekly football sessions at over 20 schools throughout Jakarta, with plans to expand further.

For more information on the AFLIC and tickets visit their website, here.

Celebrate 72 years of Indonesian independence with Temu Lawak

To celebrate the 72nd Independence Day of Indonesia in August, the Indonesian Students’ Association of Australia in Victoria (PPIA Victoria) has once again organised a comedy musical drama called Temu Lawak (Teater Muda Langkah Awal Kemerdekaan).

The theme of the second production of Temu Lawak will be historical events in the early 1930s, throwing the audience back to the era of Dutch colonialism in Indonesia. The drama will not only illustrate the war against the colonisers, but also various Indonesians’ perspectives in that era with a touch of humor and educative values.

Temu Lawak 2017 will be held on Saturday August 19, 2017, at Athenaeum Theatre in Melbourne at 2.30pm. The comedy musical drama titled Oh! Batavia will last for 80 minutes and be combined with live music and a student performance. All elements of the show, ranging from the choreography, script, music arrangement and composition are fully directed and created by Indonesian students in Victoria. (Pssst! You can also catch a glimpse of other aspects of Indonesia in this show!)

“We, Indonesian youth, would like to address the message that love and hope can be found even in the darkest of times. The stories around colonial-era Indonesia’s struggle for independence will be delivered in a fun, interesting and educative ways, meaning everyone can enjoy this show”, said Kevin Joshua, the project manager of Temu Lawak 2017.

Reflecting Temu Lawak’s success last year, PPIA Victoria hopes that Temu Lawak 2017 can serve as a means to foster the spirit of Independence Day among the younger generations and to contribute to the future of the nation.

Follow PPIA Victoria’s Instagram and Facebook page for more information. You can also purchase tickets at tinyurl.com/2017temulawak or by contacting Ovi (+61431 732 303) or Nesia (+61499 781 230).

AIYA Links: 28 July

In the news

On the blog

Events

Opportunities

  • NTA East Indonesia Aid Marketing and Membership Committee has a number of volunteer roles available those with an interest in events, communications or fundraising.
  • Do you use dwibahasa on social media? An AIYA Masters student is looking for participants in a study investigating language behaviours of using Indonesian and English on social media. Take part in the survey today.

Apply for NAILA

Apply today for NAILA 2017 – applications have been extended until 1 September for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

Mari kita memperdalam pengertian dwibahasa kita bersama Pojok Indonesia

Siapa pernah mengalami kesulitan ketika belajar bahasa asing di negara kita sendiri?

Sekarang kita sudah dapat mengatasi kesulitan dan rasa malu waktu berbicara menggunakan bahasa asing seperti Bahasa Indonesia atau Bahasa Inggris, dengan suatu kelompok mahasiswa dari Universitas Queensland (UQ) di Australia. Kelompok tersebut bernama Pojok Indonesia, dan dulu didirikan dengan tujuan membantu para pelajar di UQ untuk lebih lancar berbicara Bahasa Indonesia, tetapi grup itu sekarang sudah berkembang dan memperbesar.

Minggu ini AIYA bertanya ‘Apa Pojok Indonesia itu sebenarnya?’ kepada salah satu ketua kelompok, Andrian Liem, bersama dengan masukan dari dosen Studi Indonesia di UQ, Dr Annie Pohlman, salah satu pediri Pojok Indonesia lima tahun yang lalu.

Kegiatan seperti apa yang dilaksanakan Pojok Indonesia?

Andrian: Pojok Indonesia adalah sebuah grup diskusi/ngobrol informal tentang berbagai topik yang diadakan seminggu sekali. Beberapa kali sempat ada makan malam bersama di restoran Indonesia.

Kelompok mahasiswa saat salah satu pertemuan Pojok Indonesia. Foto: Jane Ahlstrand

Mengapa Pojok Indonesia didirikan?

Andrian: Tujuan Pojok Indonesia didirikan setahu saya adalah sebagai sarana untuk membantu mahasiswa yang mengambil mata kuliah Bahasa Indonesia melatih percakapan dengan orang Indonesia asli.

Tetapi Pojok Indonesia tidak hanya untuk mahasiswa – siapa saja yang tertarik atau punya pengalaman dengan Bahasa dan budaya Indonesia bisa datang ke sini.

Annie: Awalnya Pojok Indonesia didirikan pada tahun 2012 oleh saya (sebagai wakil program Bahasa Indonesia di Fakultas Budaya dan Bahasa di UQ) bersama dengan UQISA (UQ Indonesian Students’ Association), khususnya Dr Pan Mohamad Faiz and Dr Mirza Satria Buana, yang merupakan kedua President UQISA saat itu (tahun 2012 dan 2013 masing-masing).

Tujuan kami pada waktu itu adalah untuk mendukung diskusi mengenai hubungan Indonesia-Australia dalam Bahasa Indonesia.

Bagaimana peran Pojok Indonesia dalam memperjuangkan pengajaran Bahasa Indonesia?

Andrian: Di Pojok Indonesia ada orang Indonesia asli sehingga mereka yang ingin meningkatan kemampuan Bahasa Indonesianya bisa berlatih untuk bercakap-cakap di sini.

Selain kosa kata, bisa juga menambah pengetahuan tentang Indonesia yang tidak diajarkan di kelas.

Tolong bagikan suatu contoh cerita lucu yang pernah terjadi saat pertemuan Pojok Indonesia, atau suatu ingatan yang paling mengesankan.

Andrian: Sebagai fasilitator dan orang asli Indonesia, kadang saya suka geli ketika mendengar orang asing mengucapkan kata atau kalimat dalam Bahasa Indonesia karena terdengar berbeda. Atau kadang orang asing juga geli dan heran ketika ada kata Bahasa Indonesia yang sangat berbeda jauh ketika diterjemahkan ke dalam Bahasa Inggris.

Misalnya dalam suatu pertemuan topiknya adalah bunga. Bunga marigold kesannya anggun kalau dalam Bahasa Inggris tetapi menjadi jelek ketika diubah ke Bahasa Indonesia, yaitu “bunga tahi ayam” karena aromanya yang kurang sedap.

Contoh kata lain yang jauh maknanya ketika diterjemahkan adalah ibu jari karena kalau diubah ke Bahasa Inggris jadi motherfinger.

Foto: Jane Ahlstrand

Apa yang seharusnya kita lakukan supaya lebih banyak mahasiswa memilih untuk belajar Bahasa Indonesia, dan juga lanjut sampai ke tingkat mahir?

Andrian: Sebaiknya Bahasa Indonesia dikenalkan sejak usia dini, mungkin dari tingkat sekolah dasar. Tidak hanya Bahasa tetapi Budaya Indonesia, misal melalui tarian, makanan, dan pementasan drama yang diangkat dari cerita rakyat atau legenda nusantara.

Apakah ada rencana untuk Pojok Indonesia ke depan?

Andrian: Baru-baru ini Balai Bahasa dan Budaya Indonesian Queensland (BBBIQ) didirikan dan akan membawahi Pojok Indonesia ke depan. Harapannya lebih banyak orang asing yang datang ke Pojok Indonesia dan belajar Bahasa Indonesia.

Tertarik dengan Pojok Indonesia? Join grup Facebook mereka di sini.

AIYA Links: 21 July

In the news

  • Hardline group Hizbut Tahrir (HTI) has had its legal status in Indonesia revoked.
  • ‘The government’s actions have proven controversial and there are strong grounds for arguing that both decisions undermine Indonesian democracy and carry considerable political risk for Jokowi’ says Gregory Fealy of the ban and last week’s announcement to ban groups that undermine Pancasila.
  • A group of Australian cattle farmers is suing the Federal Government for $600 million in compensation after live exports to Indonesia were banned in June 2011.
  • Last week, Indonesian officials announced that they had renamed the waters at the far southern end of the South China Sea the ‘North Natuna Sea’. In the Lowy Interpreter, Aaron Connelly assesses the impact of this new name.
  • Setya Novanto, speaker of Indonesia’s House of Representatives, was named a suspect by the Corruption Eradication Commission.
  • Australia’s ambassador to Indonesia Paul Grigson announced on Tuesday that Australia would be providing funding through the World Bank to help create ‘10 new Balis‘ in an initiative to boost tourism to Indonesia.
  • Follow the story of Indonesian maids in Hong Kong being radicalised and supporting IS.

On the blog

Events

Opportunities

 

  • Applications close TONIGHT to join us at AIYA! We are recruiting three new positions in the National Communications Team as well as a new Director of Communications. For more information and to apply check out the position description for the communications officers and Director of Communications.
  • NTA East Indonesia Aid Marketing and Membership Committee has a number of volunteer roles available those with an interest in events, communications or fundraising.
  • Do you use dwibahasa on social media? An AIYA Masters student is looking for participants in a study investigating language behaviours of using Indonesian and English on social media. To get more information check here or email skuj0004@flinders.edu.au.

Apply for NAILA

Apply today for NAILA 2017 – applications have been extended until 1 September for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.