AIYA Links: 23 June

Selamat Hari Raya Idul Fitri, Mohon Maaf Lahir dan Batin. AIYA wishes all that celebrate a happy and safe Idul Fitri.

In the news

  • Nearly 30 million Indonesians are expected to travel over the Idul Fitri holiday.
  • A review of the 2003 anti-terror bill is currently before the Indonesian parliament. Under the new laws authorities could jail for up to 15 years citizens returning to Indonesia after joining militant groups abroad.
  • A joint parliamentary committee in Australia has concluded that more effort is needed to entice Australian business to Indonesia and portray it as a growing economic powerhouse.
  • Facebook has received an in-principle approval to set up a domestic unit in Indonesia.
  • Follow the story of saving and preserving recordings of gamelan from Bali, originally captured in 1928.

Apply for NAILA

Apply today for NAILA 2017 – applications open now for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

Events

  • Sydney, 28 June – Join the Sydney launch of Asia Society’s ‘Disruptive Asia‘ publication.
  • Adelaide, 29 June – Grab a coffee, meet new people and practice your language skills at AIYA South Australia’s monthly language exchange.
  • Melbourne, 30 June – Asia Society’s launch of the ‘Disruptive Asia‘ publication comes to Melbourne too.

Opportunities

  • Join the NAILA committee! There are several available positions at the moment to become part of Australia’s largest Bahasa Indonesia language competition whilst developing your leadership and organisational skills.
  • Based in South Australia? Become part of the next AIYA South Australia Chapter Executive
  • Do you use dwibahasa on social media? An AIYA Masters student is looking for participants in a study investigating language behaviours of using Indonesian and English on social media. To get more information check here or email skuj0004@flinders.edu.au.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

AIYA Links: 16 June

Apply for NAILA 2017 – applications open now for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

In the news

  • Former U.S. president Barack Obama will visit Indonesia at the end of this month. He is reported to give the keynote address at the fourth Indonesian Diaspora Congress and to meet with Jokowi.
  • Members of Nahdlatul Ulama are strongly advocating an end to intolerance and defending inclusive Islam.
  • Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death for Indonesian women. In Coconuts Jakarta, Kate Walton writes that the high fatality rate is tied to attitudes towards sex.

At the blog

  • Read the second-part of our series In Conversation with Desi Anwar. In Part Two Anwar reflects on how Indonesian’s and Australian’s perceive one another and opportunities for future engagement between our two countries. You can catch the first-part in the series article exploring Indonesia’s journalistic freedom and the transition to democracy here.

Events

  • Adelaide, 19 June – Come along to AIYA South Australia’s free film screening of ‘Aisyah, Biarkan Kami Bersaudara.
  • Perth, Canberra, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, 19 – 23 June – AIBC  is hosting a special business breakfast event with Prof. Bambang Brodjonegoro, Indonesia’s Minister of National Planning, around the country. AIYA Members get a special discount rate to these events – please contact your local chapter for the discount code.
  • Sydney, 28 June – Join the Sydney launch of Asia Society’s ‘Disruptive Asia‘ publication.
  • Adelaide, 29 June – Grab a coffee, meet new people and practice your language skills at AIYA South Australia’s monthly language exchange.
  • Melbourne, 30 June – Asia Society’s launch of the ‘Disruptive Asia‘ publication comes to Melbourne too.

Opportunities

  • Join the NAILA committee! There are several available positions at the moment to become part of Australia’s largest Bahasa Indonesia language competition whilst developing your leadership and organisational skills.
  • Based in South Australia? Become part of the next AIYA South Australia Chapter Executive!
  • Asia Society Australia is seeking interns with an interest in Asia and Australia-Asia relations to join them in Sydney.
  • The Australian Institute for International Affairs is now accepting applications for their Euan Crone Asian Awareness Scholarship. The scholarship grants up to $5,000 to deepen awareness of Asia among young Australians.
  • Do you use dwibahasa on social media? An AIYA Masters student is looking for participants in a study investigating language behaviours of using Indonesian and English on social media. To get more information check here or email skuj0004@flinders.edu.au.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

In Conversation with Desi Anwar: Perspectives, perceptions and pathways for engagement across Indonesia and Australia

Welcome to the second-part of our series In Conversation with Desi Anwar. In this article, Desi Anwar reflects on how we as Indonesians and Australians perceive one another and opportunities for future engagement between our two countries. You can catch the first part in the series article exploring Indonesia’s journalistic freedom and the transition to democracy here.

Desi Anwar and Cass Grant at the Sydney Writers Festival

So much of the time, our perceptions are influenced by what we see in the media. If we look at current affairs, good news is bad news – and this is the news that sells. So how does that affect the perceptions that we as Indonesians and Australians have of one another?

We are all very much constrained with our own perceptions that the media feeds us.

The thing about Indonesia is – it’s an incredibly diverse and complex nation. I think, we fail to, and it’s difficult for a neighbouring country to understand just how complex Indonesia is. Indonesia is too big a country to be categorised and stereotyped by one small thing such as terrorism, natural disasters or poverty.

Focussing on one element of a country is an easy way to dismiss its complexity.

And there is no reason that people wouldn’t think things like this about Indonesia unless we come up with a much more complete picture.

This perception is a fault of the media in many ways. Indonesia is a huge, diverse and plural country and yet so often the media doesn’t include this context. Indonesia has many different ethnic groups, and yes the country is facing all sorts of issues from natural and man-made disasters, equitable development, forest and land burning and corruption. But the context is important – and unless we understand this context, we cannot begin to understand Indonesia.

Indonesians have a much better perception of Australia. One of the reasons for this is that many Indonesian parents can afford to send their children to Australia to study. This positive perception needs to be advanced on a much more intensive level.

By advancing these positive views we can help to overcome some of the other perceptions that Indonesians have of Australians from media. For example, one picture of Australians that Indonesians are presented with is of Australians in Bali. Often, this is of rowdy and disrespectful tourists and backpackers.

So, if we want to advance the stability, prosperity and development of our two countries and the relationships between them, what can we do to move past these perceptions?

There should be more of an effort to portray what we are at the end of the day – we’re neighbours.

There needs to be more effort to understand one another, we need to stop judging one another and we need to see where we can work together.

Australians need to go past Bali – there are 17 thousand islands of amazing beauty.

Indonesians are highly mobile, but when we go abroad, we’re not keen to settle in other countries, and we are forever homesick. We miss our mie instan, abon and rendang. Indonesians love their country with a genuine passion.

At the same time, as Indonesians we are our own harshest critic – especially when it comes to democracy. We are always criticising everything, the little things that don’t work, corruption, government effectiveness, lying politicians and so on. At the end of the day, Indonesians really feel that they want to be part of Indonesia’s future. We’re not apathetic and at election time – everybody turns up to vote, and it is peaceful at the polling booths.

All of these complexities within Indonesia should be understood by our neighbours – but at the same time – it’s nice that we are sort of a big secret. People have to physically visit Indonesia to realise that it is an incredible place to be. I am sure that in time, people will stop saying, “Indonesia, it’s a dangerous place we visited”, and they will start saying “it’s a dangerously beautiful place”. 

My advice to young Indonesians and Australians is that by opening up dialogue, borders, and experiences we can create a shared future.

Young people are open minded, curious and interested – they are the future of our relationship. By facilitating cultural and student exchanges we can give these young people the opportunity to experience and learn from one another.

I think that what will really shape the way that we view one another is through human contact. The best way to learn about the country is to learn about its people. Have real experiences, beyond what you see on television or read in social media or newspapers.

Indonesia is undergoing immense growth, and it is attracting large amounts of investment. Every Indonesian city has its own charm, rich tradition, culture and culinary experiences to offer. The opportunities and memories you can create in Indonesia are endless.

By crossing the border and meeting our neighbours – we can shift our perspectives and expand our perceptions by coming face-to-face with the beauty and complexity of our two nations.

We would like to thank Desi Anwar for taking the time to speak with us, our remarkable interview team of Cass Grant and Anastasia Pavlovic, and the team at the Sydney Writers Festival for making this interview possible.

AIYA Links: 9 June

Apply for NAILA 2017 – applications open now for a wide range of categories, including the new categories of a Junior Executive Award, Senior Executive Award, and the Teacher’s Award.

In the news

  • In the Washington Post, Tom Pepinsky comments on diversity in Indonesia in the wake of the Jakarta elections and trial of Ahok.
  • At an UN oceans summit, delegates from China, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines pledged they would work to keep plastics out of the seas.
  • Indonesia is set to expand its budget for infrastructure, with government proposals outlining an increase as much as 17%. This is part of a plan to attract more businesses to the country.
  • The Indonesian government is undertaking a process to catalogue all of the islands in the archipelago state with the UN.
  • What has ACICIS been up to this past year? Find out in their annual report.
  • In the latest Talking Indonesia podcast, Jemma Purdey and Devi Asmarani discuss the state of women’s activism in Indonesia.

At the blog

  • With a career spanning over two decades, Desi Anwar is a household name in Indonesia. She is a distinguished columnist, senior anchor, journalist and the host of Insight with Desi Anwar on CNN Indonesia. The AIYA team caught up with Desi at the Sydney Writers’ Festival to talk about her homeland.

Events

  • Melbourne, 14 June – Practice your language skills at AIYA Victoria’s Language Exchange.
  • Jakarta, 14 June – Join AIYA Jakarta for a Buka Puasa Bersama.
  • Adelaide, 19 June – Come along to AIYA South Australia’s free film screening of ‘Aisyah, Biarkan Kami Bersaudara.
  • Perth, Canberra, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, 19 – 23 June – AIBC  is hosting a special business breakfast event with Prof. Bambang Brodjonegoro, Indonesia’s Minister of National Planning, around the country. AIYA Members get a special discount rate to these events – please contact your local chapter for the discount code.
  • Sydney, 28 June – Join the Sydney launch of Asia Society’s ‘Disruptive Asia‘ publication.
  • Adelaide, 29 June – Grab a coffee, meet new people and practice your language skills at AIYA South Australia’s monthly language exchange.
  • Melbourne, 30 June – Asia Society’s launch of the ‘Disruptive Asia‘ publication comes to Melbourne too.

Opportunities

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

In Conversation with Desi Anwar: The Transition to Democracy and Journalistic Freedom

With a career spanning over two decades, Desi Anwar is a household name in Indonesia. She is a distinguished columnist, senior anchor, journalist and the host of Insight with Desi Anwar on CNN Indonesia. The AIYA team caught up with Desi to talk about her remarkable homeland.

Source: Whiteboard Journal

In this article, the first in a two-part series, Desi Anwar gives us a unique perspective on journalistic freedom in Indonesia during the Soeharto era compared to now.

Beginning her television career in 1990, during the time of The New Order regime, Desi didn’t just witness the transition to democracy – she was centre stage reporting on it to the nation.

When I began my career, Indonesia only had one television station and the press was very heavily censored. This station was state sponsored TVRI, a public relations tool for the government reporting on development progress and telling good news stories about Indonesia. If you wanted to see the bad news about the rest of the world, you watched Dunia Dalam Berita but on TVRI – only good things happened in Indonesia.

Desi began her career with Indonesia’s first commercial television channel RCTI, owned by the son of ex-President Soekarno, and pioneered the country’s leading primetime news program, Seputar Indonesia.

At the time, Seputar Indonesia was called a “magazine” because we couldn’t talk about the “news”. We couldn’t report on politics or anything to do with religious ethnic and tribal tensions. We focused on the lives of ordinary Indonesian’s, life in Jakarta, macet, the floods and so on. And this is what made the show so popular – Seputar Indonesia was about what was important to the people. It wasn’t about what the government thinks it’s important to you. What people think is important can include economic, social and cultural issues.

Within six months of its launch the show it was a hit – they put towers up all across Indonesia so that the entire country could watch. The show gained such popularity that the government decided that if they didn’t appear on Seputar Indonesia, nobody would be watching them and they would be left behind.

We created a new way of imparting information that had never happened before.

Following the show’s immense popularity, airing four times a day, Seputar Indonesia was invited to do more formal coverage reporting on what the government was doing, they joined Presidential trips and state visits.

After seeing the success of RCTI within the next few years, Indonesia saw explosive growth in the media industry. The nation went from having only one state-sponsored television channel to having five national channels all competing for attention. At the same time, the spread of information grew as more and more Indonesian people were gaining access to new information through free-to-air television.

Over the course of the next eight years, the Indonesian people got used to seeing themselves on television and knowing what was going on around them. In 1998, when the economic crisis hit, Seputar Indonesia reported on the drop in the Rupiah from 2000 IDR to 1 USD to 10,000 IDR to 1 USD. And when the student demonstrations and riots began Seputar was airing it.

I remember one day when the students were standing on top of the Parliament building and the house speaker Harmoko, from the Ministry of Information – then seen as very much a loyalist to Soeharto and the guy who would be calling me to say “you’re not allowed to do that, and you can only do this” – actually convened with the other ministers saying that Soeharto had to step down. We were the only one that taped this.

I remember, the top management team coming down and saying “I got a phone call from the owner of the television station asking – why is Harmoko on my television telling the President Soeharto to step down by Thursday?” And I responded with, “well you know, all this time we had to air everything that came out of his mouth. Well look, I can’t control what came out of his mouth this time, but I still think it’s my duty to air it.” So they couldn’t really say anything.

I came in at a time when Indonesia was very much under an authoritarian leadership, and there was no freedom press until the reformasi in 1998. And this would not have happened without the growth in the television industry.

The point is that for television – Indonesian people felt that they owned the television and felt that they had a right to be getting the up the most up-to-date information.

And that was the process I went through in my work, the process of Indonesia’s democratisation.

I saw the birth of thousands of TV channels, hundreds of local channels, internet websites and Indonesian’s are now most active social media users in the world. Indonesia has one of the freest media across the ASEAN countries. This is something I am very proud to be part of – because it is very much the history of Indonesia.

Because, I think, I was not only in the wings but I was on the stage, sharing in that history and seeing how the nation developed and had grown into what it is now – a vibrant democracy.

I think that a lot of young people take it for granted now that we have many television stations and free press. But it’s not something that was given to us – it was not a right. It was something that we had to fight for, and it was an opportunity. And if we didn’t do something with that opportunity, it would have been a shame – because then Indonesia’s history would have taken a different direction.

In Conversation with Desi Anwar will continue next week as we explore how Indonesians and Australians perceive one another and opportunities for future people-to-people engagement between our two countries.

We would like to thank Desi Anwar for taking the time to speak with us, our remarkable interview team of Cass Grant and Anastasia Pavlovic, and the team at the Sydney Writers Festival for making this interview possible.

AIYA Links: 2 June

In the news

  • Yesterday was Pancasila Day. Jokowi reaffirmed his commitment to diversity in a vlog Saya Indonesia Saya Pancasila.
  • How are ‘religious values’ currently playing out in Indonesia? In the Conversation, Daniel Peterson explores the cases of Ahok and shari’a law in Aceh.
  • ‘I think gender equality should be supported, because I feel I am still exploring my creativity, while at the same time, not diminishing my obligations as a Muslim woman.’ This is the view of Firdda Kurnia, 16, one of three members of a heavy metal band in Indonesia.
  • The Australian government says it will not be represented in a Jakarta court hearing a $103 million class action on behalf of 115 young people incarcerated in Australia for alleged people smuggling.
  • ‘Being in Indonesia, it is hard to ignore the importance of family, land and culture in society. When you meet someone, they ask where you are from. This is much the same as in Indigenous culture, so we can establish our relation with each other.’ Current ACICIS student in Indonesia, Horace Hill, talks about his time in Bandung.

At the blog

  • We sit down with Rob Henry, maker of the film ‘As World Divide.’ Nine years ago, Rob left Australia and traveled to the Mentawai Islands, 150 metres off the coast of West Sumatra, to live with an indigenous tribal community. Now, he has returned with a simple message: watch a film, save a culture.
  • ‘When a local Dayak leader started negotiations by laying his sword on the table between us, I decided it was time to leave.’ Career Champion Dr Jeffrey Neilson, researcher and senior lecturer at the University of Sydney, talks about his time in the bilateral relationship and advice to young people working in resources.

Events

  • Melbourne, 3 June – Share a meal and learn more about Ramadan with AIYA Victoria and the Consulate General of the Republic of Indonesia’s Iftar dinner.
  • Melbourne, 6 June – Come along to AIYA Victoria’s weekly netball at RMIT A’Beckett.

Opportunities

  • Applications are now open for NAILA 2017! National Australia Indonesia Language Awards is an annual speech competition that rewards and fosters the development of Indonesian language learning in Australia at all levels. Primary school students through to executive level speakers apply by submitting a video of themselves speaking in Indonesian.
  • Want to get more involved? Check out their call for volunteers.

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

Learn about the remote Mentawai tribal community with Rob Henry and ‘As Worlds Divide’

Nine years ago, Rob Henry left Australia and traveled to the Mentawai Islands, 150 metres off the coast of West Sumatra, to live with an indigenous tribal community. Now, he has returned with a simple message: watch a film, save a culture.

Photo: Rob Henry

Why did you make the shift from metropolitan Australia to remote Indonesia?

There were a number of reasons that influenced my decision to resign from work and head over to the Mentawai Islands in Indonesia. After the collapse of the global economy in 2008, I wanted to leave the mainstream city environment behind because I felt I was contributing to a system that I no longer trusted. I needed to explore alternatives – a more meaningful, fulfilling and sustainable way to exist. This desire, combined with my connection to surfing, brought me to Mentawai.

I am back to Australia on and off at the moment to release a documentary film called As Worlds Divide, which is aimed at raising awareness and support to help the Mentawai community prevent the devastating loss of their indigenous culture.

Describe daily life in the Mentawai Islands. What was it like for you as an Australian joining from outside?

The pace of Mentawai daily life is much slower than what I had become accustomed to in Melbourne, which, whilst difficult to adapt to in the earlier stages, I now feel is a much healthier and more balanced way to live.

The first few months were incredibly challenging because I didn’t speak Indonesian or the Mentawai language. I was living with a government settlement community in a small coconut farming village, which is where I learnt the basics of the language. Here, I also learnt about a tribal community living further into the forest. My shift into the tribal community wasn’t as challenging as my initial arrival because I was able to communicate with them and therefore understand whether they were happy to have me there or not!

Photo: Tariq Zaidi

What was the biggest hardship you encountered?

By far the most eye-opening but also heart-breaking observation to grasp was just how different the people from the forest are to those who had been resettled into government villages. Seeing how rich their lives are in the forest – in terms of resources, pride, purpose, belief, attitude and even aesthetic – I realised that those from the coconut-farming village, despite being provided national schooling and various other infrastructural developments, were in fact living in a state of poverty. This troubled me for many months and in the end led me to undertake years of research in trying to understand the exact cause of this change and consequential disparity.

What was the single biggest takeaway from your time there?

If having to state just one, I’d say the biggest takeaway would be just how integral culture and connection to the land are to sustain the health and wellbeing of an indigenous people, or any group of people for that matter. Beyond the practicalities – where the land provides food, water, medicine, building resources and so forth – the sense of belonging to a community, having purpose and belief is such a critical ingredient in the makeup of one’s physical and mental health. For the Mentawai, maintaining a strong connection to culture protects them from destitution – for both the people and the land.

Photo: Rob Henry

What do you hope to achieve with the premiere of the As Worlds Divide documentary?

Over the past nine years, in support of the community’s Cultural and Environmental Education Program (CEEP), we’ve established a non-profit organisation in Australia called the Indigenous Education Foundation (IEF) and a yayasan in Mentawai called Yayasan Pendidikan Global Pribumi Indonesia (YPGPI).

The role of IEF is to help raise global awareness and support to empower YPGPI and enable them the necessary tools to implement their suku Mentawai CEEP. In effect, the As Worlds Divide film is key to sharing the Mentawai voice throughout the world – informing people about their indigenous culture, the issues they face, the community-driven CEEP solution, and of course reaching out for support to facilitate its success.

To help this along, IEF have developed the film’s #wafsac (“watch a film, save a culture”) campaign, whereby we invite people all over the world to do exactly that – #wafsac. This can be achieved by simply hosting a small screening and/or registering your details to join the #wafsac community and help us spread the word. This is what we hope to achieve with As Worlds Divide.

Masurak bagatta, thank you.

For more info on the Mentawai Islands and how to get involved with #wafsac, visit www.iefprograms.org/wafsac.

Foster your passion for Indonesia with language skills, says career champion Jeffrey Neilson

“When a local Dayak leader started negotiations by laying his sword on the table between us, I decided it was time to leave.”

The Australia Indonesia Awards celebrate the contributions of those who provide inspiration and enhance understanding between Australians and Indonesians. AIYA is chronicling the achievements of these Career Champions in a series of interviews with this year’s finalists. Today we hear from Dr Jeffrey Neilson, researcher and senior lecturer at the University of Sydney.

Tell us a little about your early career. What brought you to connect with Indonesia?

Jeffrey at the Ubud Food Festival in 2016.

I started studying Indonesian at high school in Australia, and first got excited about Indonesia during a field school that my school organised to Bali in 1989. After a few backpacking trips across Sumatra, I then picked up Indonesian language again at university, where I was studying Environmental Science as my main degree.

I participated in semester-long program at Universitas Indonesia in 1994, where we sat in on Indonesian literature classes and did an internship with a World Bank Land Administration project. My first exposure to research was a study on how land administration and titling might affect Dayak communities in the Meratus Mountains of South Kalimantan, who were practicing swidden agriculture.

I decided to stay on in Indonesia after the semester program once I found a job with an environmental consulting firm in Jakarta. It was my language skills that got me this job. I would translate reports and Indonesian laws for the company while developing skills in environmental and social impact assessment. For the next few years, while I completed my degrees in Australia, the company would fly me up to Jakarta to work during university breaks.

Like so many other people I know, I got my first professional job because of my Indonesian language skills.

Tell us about your current occupation.

After graduating, I worked from 1999-2001 on a gold mine in Central Kalimantan. This was a very tense work environment as both the Australian company, who held a Contract of Work with the government, and a community of some 5000 small-scale miners were equally intent to access the ore. It was my role to mediate. When a local Dayak leader started a negotiation meeting by laying his Mandau sword on the table between us, I decided it was time to leave the mine.

I enrolled in a PhD program in geography at the University of Sydney, where I studied livelihoods and the coffee trade in the Toraja region of Sulawesi. This led to an Australian Research Council postdoc and then a lecturing position at the University of Sydney. Again, I believe that my Indonesian experience was a key factor in my employment. I continue to do research on rural development, natural resources and global markets in Indonesia.

In addition to research activities, I also design and develop opportunities for undergraduate students to experience Indonesia through short-term field schools and semester-long learning programs that combine language learning with geography. I am a big believer that language learning should ideally be combined with other disciplinary specific or technical knowledge and skills.

What do you enjoy the most about working in Indonesia?

I love the natural beauty and cultural diversity of Indonesia – in short, the geography of the country. The mountainous regions of Sumatra, Sulawesi and Papua are particularly favourite places. Australia has great beaches (like Indonesia), but we don’t have the same mountainous beauty that Indonesia has, and the mountain peaks are themselves so different from the sweltering coastal plains where most Indonesians live. Fortunately, my work on the Indonesian coffee sector takes me to these same mountainous regions.

What are your thoughts on the future of the Australian-Indonesian relationship in the field of resources?

There are some interesting complementarities between Australia and Indonesia in the food and agricultural sectors. We generally produce food items that the other country doesn’t produce, allowing a robust trade. Indonesia is developing a sophisticated food processing sector, and Australia is benefiting from the supply of raw materials – just think of the Australia wheat used to make Indomie, which is then exported all around the world.

And Australia has one of the most dynamic and innovative specialty coffee sectors in the world. Australian coffee styles are now being adopted in the US, Europe and across Asia (including in Indonesia). Some interesting relationships are now developing between Australian roasters and the many regions of Indonesia that produce high quality Arabica. I’d love to see these complementarities further developed, and to see more Indonesian culinary influence in Australia.

What advice would you offer to youth interested in working in resources?

The only bit of advice I would give is to follow whatever it is you are passionate about. Indonesia offers so many opportunities for young Australians who have language skills, who are willing to learn about the society and culture, and who have a particular passion they would like to follow.

AIYA would like to thank both Jeffrey and the President of the Australia Indonesia Association of NSW, Eric de Haas. You can find Jeffrey on LinkedIn.

AIYA Links: 26 May

Applications are now open for NAILA 2017

National Australia Indonesia Language Awards is an annual speech competition that rewards and fosters the development of Indonesian language learning in Australia at all levels. Primary school students through to executive level speakers apply by submitting a video of themselves speaking in Indonesian. Check out the winning entries from NAILA 2015 and NAILA 2016 on their YouTube channel.

In the news

At the blog

Events

Opportunities

Like what we do? Support AIYA by becoming a member today.

Apply now for the National Australia Indonesia Language Awards!

Applications are now open for the 2017 National Australia Indonesia Language Awards!

NAILA is an annual speech competition that rewards and fosters the development of Indonesian language learning in Australia at all levels. We invite primary school students through to executive level speakers to submit a video of themselves speaking in Indonesian. Check out the winning entries from NAILA 2015 and NAILA 2016 on our YouTube channel.

Submissions are assessed by a panel of VIP judges, and participants have the chance to win $16,000 worth of prizes and celebrate their success in a national awards ceremony and networking evening.

This year’s theme is Origins. Applicants should endeavour to use the phrase ‘Asal usul kita / my origin(s)’ at some point in their speech.

Download our 2017 rules, instructions, topics, marking criteria and details on the award categories here. Applications close on 1 August 2017.

In 2017, the Tertiary Award category will act as a preliminary selection round for the 2018 Pidato Antarabangsa Bahasa Melayu (PABM) competition coordinated by the office of the Prime Minister of Malaysia. One tertiary student from each country across the globe is selected to represent their state in the Malaysian-Indonesian speaking competition.

In addition to NAILA’s 9 award categories, in 2017 there is a Senior Executive Award (ages 31 years and over) and a Teachers’ Award for primary and secondary school teachers who submit multiple high-quality videos of their students. Find out more on the NAILA website.

Follow NAILA on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn to stay up to date with all NAILA activities!